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Do You Have a Vitamin Deficiency?

By: Angela Ciroalo

Having a vitamin deficiency is a big deal.

Some people go days, weeks and years not knowing that they have a deficiency. Many people have issues that they overlook, think is normal, or receive medication for — without EVER looking at the root cause.

Below I have listed a guide where you can look at your symptoms and get an idea of what vitamin you may need a little more of.

Signs of Nutritional Deficiency

Taken from healthyfoodplace.com

I never know that you could take a vitamin to aid in preventing acne during menstruation. I also never knew that there was a vitamin to take to aid in preventing dandruff.

The truth is, we were not created to have issues with our body. Anything that is not right is likely due to a deficiency or imbalance.

It is all-too-common for us to just buy quick fix solutions, rather than seeking the root cause and healing naturally. However, this should NOT be the cause.

Below I have listed a quick guide explaining what each of the vitamins and minerals are, the benefits that they offer, the recommended daily amount (RDA), and their food sources.

After reading this you can experiment with supplements and incorporating foods that offer these vitamins and minerals naturally in your diet!

Listing of vitamins (Harvard Medical School)

Vitamin (common names)
Benefits
Recommended amount (dailyRDA* or dailyAI**)
Upper limit (UL) per day
Good food sources
Did you know?
VITAMIN A(Retinol, retinal, and retinoic acid — three active forms of vitamin A in the body — are retinoids, “preformed” vitamin A. Beta carotene can easily be converted to vitamin A as needed.) Essential for vision Lycopene may lower prostate cancer risk. Keeps tissues and skin healthy. Plays an important role in bone growth. Diets rich in the carotenoids alpha carotene and lycopene seem to lower lung cancer risk. Carotenoids act as antioxidants. Foods rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin may protect against cataracts M: 900 mcg (3,000 IU)W: 700 mcg (2,333IU)Some supplements report vitamin A in international units (IU’s). 3,000 mcg (about 10,000 IU) Sources of retinoids:beef, liver, eggs, shrimp, fish, fortified milk, cheddar cheese, Swiss cheese

Sources of beta carotene:sweet potatoes, carrots, pumpkins, squash, spinach, mangoes, turnip greens

Many people get too much preformed vitamin A from food and supplements.Large amounts of supplemental vitamin A (but not beta carotene) can be harmful to bones.
THIAMIN (vitamin B1) Helps convert food into energy. Needed for healthy skin, hair, muscles, and brain M: 1.2 mg, W: 1.1 mg Not known Pork chops, ham, soymilk, watermelons, acorn squash Most nutritious foods have some thiamin.
RIBOFLAVIN(vitamin B2) Helps convert food into energy. Needed for healthy skin, hair, blood, and brain M: 1.3 mg, W: 1.1 mg Not known Milk, yogurt, cheese, whole and enriched grains and cereals, liver Most Americans get enough of this nutrient.
NIACIN (vitamin B3, nicotinic acid) Helps convert food into energy. Essential for healthy skin, blood cells, brain, and nervous system M: 16 mg, W: 14 mg 35 mg Meat, poultry, fish, fortified and whole grains, mushrooms, potatoes, peanut butter Niacin occurs naturally in food and can also be made by your body from the amino acid tryptophan, with the help of B6.
PANTOTHENICACID (vitamin B5) Helps convert food into energy. Helps make lipids (fats), neurotransmitters, steroid hormones, and hemoglobin M: 5 mg, W: 5 mg Not known Wide variety of nutritious foods, including chicken, whole grains, broccoli, mushrooms, avocados, tomato products Deficiency causes burning feet and other neurologic symptoms.
VITAMINB6(pyridoxal, pyridoxine, pyridoxamine) Aids in lowering homocysteine levels and may reduce the risk of heart diseaseHelps convert tryptophan to niacin and serotonin, a neurotransmitter that plays key roles in sleep, appetite, and moods. Helps make red blood cells Influences cognitive abilities and immune function 31–50: M: 1.3 mg, W: 1.3 mg51+: M: 1.7 mg, W: 1.5 mg 100 mg Meat, fish, poultry, legumes, tofu and other soy products, potatoes, noncitrus fruits such as bananas and watermelons Many people don’t get enough of this nutrient.
Vitamin B12(cobalamin) Aids in lowering homocysteine levels and may lower the risk of heart disease. Assists in making new cells and breaking down some fatty acids and amino acids. Protects nerve cells and encourages their normal growth Helps make red blood cells M: 2.4 mcg, W: 2.4 mcg Not known Meat, poultry, fish, milk, cheese, eggs, fortified cereals, fortified soymilk Some people, particularly older adults, are deficient in vitamin B12 because they have trouble absorbing this vitamin from food. A lack of vitamin B12 can cause memory loss, dementia, and numbness in the arms and legs.
BIOTIN Helps convert food into energy and synthesize glucose. Helps make and break down some fatty acids. Needed for healthy bones and hair M: 30 mcg, W: 30 mcg Not known Many foods, including whole grains, organ meats, egg yolks, soybeans, and fish Your body needs very little biotin. Some is made by bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. However, it’s not clear how much of this the body absorbs.
VITAMIN C(ascorbic acid) Foods rich in vitamin C may lower the risk for some cancers, including those of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, and breast. Long-term use of supplemental vitamin C may protect against cataracts. Helps make collagen, a connective tissue that knits together wounds and supports blood vessel walls. Helps make the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine Acts as an antioxidant, neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage cells. Bolsters the immune system M: 90 mg, W: 75 mg Smokers:Add 35 mg 2,000 mg Fruits and fruit juices (especially citrus), potatoes, broccoli, bell peppers, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts Evidence that vitamin C helps reduce colds has not been convincing.
CHOLINE Helps make and release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which aids in many nerve and brain activities. Plays a role in metabolizing and transporting fats M: 550 mg, W: 425 mg 3,500 mg Many foods, especially milk, eggs, liver, and peanuts No rmally the body makes small amounts of choline. But experts don’t know whether this amount is enough at certain ages.
VITAMIN D(calciferol) Helps maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus, which strengthen bones. Helps form teeth and bones. Supplements can reduce the number of non-spinal fractures 31–50: 5 mcg (200 IU) 51–70: 10 mcg (400 IU) 71+: 15 mcg (600 IU) 50 mcg (2,000 IU) Fortified milk or margarine, fortified cereals, fatty fish Many people don’t get enough of this nutrient.While the body uses sunlight to make vitamin D, it cannot make enough if you live in northern climes or don’t spend much time in the sun.
VITAMIN E (alpha-tocopherol) Acts as an antioxidant, neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage cells. Protects vitamin A and certain lipids from damage. Diets rich in vitamin E may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Supplements may protect against prostate cancer M: 15 mg, W: 15 mg (15 mg equals about 22IU from natural sources of vitamin E and 33 IU from synthetic vitamin E) 1,000 mg (nearly 1,500IU natural vitamin E; 2,200 IUsynthetic) Wide variety of foods, including vegetable oils, salad dressings and margarines made with vegetable oils, wheat germ, leafy green vegetables, whole grains, nuts Vitamin E does not prevent wrinkles or slow other aging processes.
FOLIC ACID(folate, folacin) Vital for new cell creationHelps prevent brain and spine birth defects when taken early in pregnancy; should be taken regularly by all women of child-bearing age since women may not know they are pregnant in the first weeks of pregnancy. Can lower levels of homocysteine and may reduce heart disease risk May reduce risk for colon cancer. Offsets breast cancer risk among women who consume alcohol M: 400 mcg, W: 400 mcg 1,000 mcg Fortified grains and cereals, asparagus, okra, spinach, turnip greens, broccoli, legumes like black-eyed peas and chickpeas, orange juice, tomato juice Many people don’t get enough of this nutrient.Occasionally, folic acid masks a B12deficiency, which can lead to severe neurological complications. That’s not a reason to avoid folic acid; just be sure to get enough B12.
VITAMIN K(phylloquinone, menadione) Activates proteins and calcium essential to blood clottingMay help prevent hip fractures M: 120 mcg, W: 90 mcg Not known Cabbage, liver, eggs, milk, spinach, broccoli, sprouts, kale, collards, and other green vegetables Intestinal bacteria make a form of vitamin K that accounts for half your requirements.If you take an anticoagulant, keep your vitamin K intake consistent.
Mineral (common names) Benefits Recommended amount (dailyRDA* or dailyAI**) Upper limit (UL) per day Good food sources Did you know?
CALCIUM Builds and protects bones and teeth. Helps with muscle contractions and relaxation, blood clotting, and nerve impulse transmission. Plays a role in hormone secretion and enzyme activation. Helps maintain healthy blood pressure 31–50: M: 1,000 mg, W: 1,000 mg 51+: M: 1,200 mg, W: 1,200 mg 2,500 mg Yogurt, cheese, milk, tofu, sardines, salmon, fortified juices, leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli and kale (but not spinach or Swiss chard, which have binders that lessen absorption) Adults absorb roughly 30% of calcium ingested, but this can vary depending on the source.Diets very high in calcium may increase the risk of prostate cancer.
CHLORIDE Balances fluids in the body. A component of stomach acid, essential to digestion Food and Nutrition Board 1989 guidelines: M: 750 mg, W: 750 mg Not known Salt (sodium chloride), soy sauce, processed foods New recommendations (DRIs) for chloride are under development by the Institute of Medicine.
CHROMIUM Enhances the activity of insulin, helps maintain normal blood glucose levels, and is needed to free energy from glucose 31–50: M: 35 mcg, W: 25 mcg 51+: M: 30 mcg, W: 20 mcg Not known Meat, poultry, fish, some cereals, nuts, cheese Unrefined foods such as brewer’s yeast, nuts, and cheeses are the best sources of chromium.
COPPER Plays an important role in iron metabolism. Helps make red blood cells M: 900 mcg, W: 900 mcg 10,000 mcg Liver, shellfish, nuts, seeds, whole-grain products, beans, prunes More than half of the copper in foods is absorbed.
FLUORIDE Encourages strong bone formation. Keeps dental cavities from starting or worsening M: 4 mg, W: 3 mg 10 mg Water that is fluoridated, toothpaste with fluoride, marine fish, teas Harmful to children in excessive amounts.
IODINE Part of thyroid hormone, which helps set body temperature and influences nerve and muscle function, reproduction, and growth. Prevents goiter and a congenital thyroid disorder M: 150 mcg, W: 150 mcg 1,100 mcg Iodized salt, processed foods, seafood To prevent iodine deficiencies, some countries add iodine to salt, bread, or drinking water.
IRON Helps hemoglobin in red blood cells and myoglobin in muscle cells ferry oxygen throughout the body. Needed for chemical reactions in the body and for making amino acids, collagen, neurotransmitters, and hormones 31–50: M: 8 mg, W: 18 mg 51+: M: 8 mg, W: 8 mg 45 mg Red meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, green vegetables, fortified bread and grain products Many women of childbearing age don’t get enough iron.Women who do not menstruate probably need the same amount of iron as men.Because iron is harder to absorb from plants, experts suggest vegetarians get twice the recommended amount (assuming the source is food).
MAGNESIUM Needed for many chemical reactions in the body Works with calcium in muscle contraction, blood clotting, and regulation of blood pressure. Helps build bones and teeth 31+: M: 420 mg, W: 320 mg 350 mg (Note: This upper limit applies to supplements and medicines, such as laxatives, not to dietary magnesium.) Green vegetables such as spinach and broccoli, legumes, cashews, sunflower seeds and other seeds, halibut, whole-wheat bread, milk The majority of magnesium in the body is found in bones. If your blood levels are low, your body may tap into these reserves to correct the problem.
MANGANESE Helps form bones. Helps metabolize amino acids, cholesterol, and carbohydrates M: 2.3 mg, W: 1.8 mg 11 mg Nuts, legumes, whole grains, tea If you take supplements or have manganese in your drinking water, be careful not to exceed the upper limit. Those with liver damage or whose diets supply abundant manganese should be especially vigilant.
MOLYBDENUM Part of several enzymes, one of which helps ward off a form of severe neurological damage in infants that can lead to early death M: 45 mcg, W: 45 mcg 2,000 mcg Legumes, nuts, grain products, milk Molybdenum deficiencies are rare.
PHOSPHORUS Helps build and protect bones and teethPart ofDNA and RNA.Helps convert food into energy. Part of phospholipids, which carry lipids in blood and help shuttle nutrients into and out of cells M: 700 mg, W: 700 mg 31–70: 4,000 mg 71+: 3,000 mg Wide variety of foods, including milk and dairy products, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, liver, green peas, broccoli, potatoes, almonds Certain drugs bind with phosphorus, making it unavailable and causing bone loss, weakness, and pain.
POTASSIUM Balances fluids in the body. Helps maintain steady heartbeat and send nerve impulses. Needed for muscle contractions. A diet rich in potassium seems to lower blood pressure. Getting enough potassium from your diet may benefit bones Food and Nutrition Board 1989 guidelines: M: 2,000 mg, W: 2,000 mg Not known Meat, milk, fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes New recommendations (DRIs) for potassium are under development by the Institute of Medicine.Food sources do not cause toxicity, but high-dose supplements might.
SELENIUM Acts as an antioxidant, neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage cells. Helps regulate thyroid hormone activity M: 55 mcg, W: 55 mcg 400 mcg Organ meats, seafood, walnuts, sometimes plants (depends on soil content), grain products Researchers are investigating whether selenium may help reduce the risk of developing cancer.
SODIUM Balances fluids in the body. Helps send nerve impulses. Needed for muscle contractionsImpacts blood pressure; even modest reductions in salt consumption can lower blood pressure Food and Nutrition Board 1989 guidelines: M: 500 mg, W: 500 mg Not determined Salt, soy sauce, processed foods, vegetables While experts recommend that people limit sodium intake to 2,400 mg, most Americans consume 4,000–6,000 mg a day.New recommendations (DRIs) for sodium are being developed by the Institute of Medicine.
SULFUR Helps form bridges that shape and stabilize some protein structures. Needed for healthy hair, skin, and nails Unknown Unknown Protein-rich foods, such as meats, fish, poultry, nuts, legumes Sulfur is a component of thiamin and certain amino acids. There is no recommended amount for sulfur. Deficiencies occur only with a severe lack of protein.
ZINC Helps form many enzymes and proteins and create new cellsFrees vitamin A from storage in the liver. Needed for immune system, taste, smell, and wound healing. When taken with certain antioxidants, zinc may delay the progression of age-related macular degeneration M: 11 mg, W: 8 mg 40 mg Red meat, poultry, oysters and some other seafood, fortified cereals, beans, nuts Because vegetarians absorb less zinc, experts suggest that they get twice the recommended requirement of zinc from plant foods.
*Recommended dietary allowance **Adequate intake

Information taken from Harvard Medical School

My best advice, however, is to ask your doctor for a full panel blood test. Ask your doctor to check ALL of your vitamin and mineral levels!

Once the test results are in, look your results over and make sure that your levels are above average. If they are low or under average, incorporate healthy sources into your diet and consider supplementation until you are above average.

If you are somewhat low, or just under average, in any level than you may be at risk of becoming deficient soon. Doctors often do not recommend supplementing unless you are low, so be aware of this.

Your goal is to have optimal, exuberant health. To be the healthiest and happiest person possible 🙂

I hope all is well and that your vitamin levels are above average ❤

If you have any additional questions relating to your health and vitamin levels I would be glad to help and offer any guidance. Email me at angelajoynutrition@gmail.com

Choose Happiness

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings,

Angela Joy

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Say “No” To Weighing Yourself & “Yes” to Loving Yourself

By: Angela Ciroalo

Weighing ourselves is a common thing that we all likely do.

We tend to weigh ourselves as we exit the bathroom, enter our bedrooms, or even just before we leave the house.

Instead of placing the number in your mind, I am going to give you an alternative for ONE week.

I am challenging you to go one full week without weighing yourself.

Take The Challenge

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy 

Use this week to instead focus on the successes that you experienced (going to the gym, eating a banana instead of cookies, sleeping an extra hour, drinking several cups of water).

Remove all negativity: Remove your thoughts about how many pounds you want to lose, the areas of your body you are unhappy with and, overall, any thing that brings you stress or unhappiness.

Too often we place our focus on what we did not do, what we have done wrong or what we still need to do — instead of all of the wonderful things WE DID DO!

No hate zone

Photo taken from thecurvyfashionista.com

These are all negative thoughts that poison the mind and prevent improvement.

These thoughts weigh you down, bring you stress and aggravation, prevent you from being happy — and decrease you opportunity for success.

Therefore, use the next week to detox your negative thoughts (including the number on the scale) and instead begin taken steps to learn to love yourself.

Love yourself for all of the wonderful things you have accomplished, done correctly, succeeded in, and so forth 🙂 I am sure there are a TON, but you have overshadowed them on all that you did not do right. Stop that!! ❤

Love yourself

Photo taken from cubeoflife.wordpress.com

Those few minutes that you would have spent weighing yourself, you can instead look in the mirror and remind yourself of you beautiful or handsome you are.

This sounds silly, but it is really nice to hear from yourself. The more you tell yourself how much you truly do love yourself, the more you will believe it and then express it in your actions and behaviors.

Loveing yourself

Photo taken from happyherbivore.com

Loving yourself expresses confidence, which allows you to be positive, thus happier and overall successful in all that you do. 

Try this one week challenge and take note of the changes that you feel each day.

You will be very surprised of how much this small change will impact your life!!

Choose Happiness

Photo taken from damyhealth.com

Take the challenge today: Say “No” to weighing yourself and “Yes” to loving yourself 🙂

Good luck with this exercise. Let me know how it works out.

Beauty

Photo taken from happygoluckyblog.com

Beautiful

Photo taken from Vuible.com

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings!

Best,

Angela Joy xo

Tips on proper hydration and electrolyte consumption

By: Angela Joy

As summer sets in, many are preparing to take their exercise routines outdoors. However, before you head outside for your next run, bike ride or even basketball game, make sure you are properly hydrated.

The heat of the outdoor sun combined with the movement of our body causes our skin to perspire water and minerals. We sweat out water and minerals to cool the body down, preventing heat exhaustion.

To properly restore the water and minerals lost through our skin, you can follow these helpful tips that will include; the adequate amount of water to drink; the electrolytes needed for proper body functioning; as well as natural, organic electrolyte sources.

What are electrolytes? 

The minerals we lose through sweat commonly known as electrolytes.

According to the online healthcare publishing company Medical News Today [MNT], electrolytes are defined as any substance that contains free ions that behave as an electrically conductive medium.

Electrolytes are made up of minerals including sodium, potassium, calcium, bicarbonate, magnesium, chloride, hydrogen phosphate and hydrogen carbonate.

According to the Medical News Today article titled, “What are electrolytes,” humans cannot function without proper electrolyte levels.

“Electrolytes regulate our nerve and muscle function, our body’s hydration, blood pH, blood pressure and the rebuilding of damaged tissue,” Medical News Today stated in the 2014 article.

Not properly restoring electrolyte levels in the body during or after exercise can lead to dehydration, fatigue, muscle cramping and more.

In an effort to prevent dehydration amongst athletes and exercise enthusiasts, the American College of Sports Medicine [ACSM] created proper hydration standards.

The ACSM suggests that those exercising outdoors, or for long periods of time, replenish the amount of fluid lost, as well as the electrolytes lost, during exercise.

According to ACSM, the amount of fluids and electrolytes each person should consume will depend upon the individual, the amount of sweat perspired, and the length or exertion level of their exercise.

Water

Photo taken from girlsgotsole.com

Tips for avoiding dehydration

To avoid dehydration, the ACSM suggests that those participating in exercise drink 16 to 20 fluid ounces of water, or a sports beverage, at least four hours before exercise with and additional 8 to 12 fluid ounces of water consumed 10 to 15 minutes before exercise.

During exercise, the ACSM suggests that exercisers drink three to eight fluid ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes when exercising less than 60 minutes.

Running water

Photo taken from getactivetampa.com

If exercise is longer than 60 minutes, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise consume three to eight fluid ounces of a sport beverage, made up of carbohydrates and electrolytes, every 15 to 20 minutes.

The ACSM warns that those exercising do not drink more than one quart of liquids per hour, to avoid over-hydrating.

Once exercise is completed, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise estimate their fluid losses, then restore the full amount lost within two hours of exercise.

According to the ACSM, if you were to feel very thin after a bout of exercise, this is the result of fluid loss and not weight loss — therefore the steps to properly restore the body’s fluids should be taken as soon as possible.

Tips for properly restoring electrolytes 

Proper hydrating fluids generally include a carbohydrate [glucose] that also offers electrolyte minerals.

The ACSM stated that a liquid that includes a carbohydrate, or sugar, will replenish the lost glycogen in the muscles — preventing cramps and assisting with muscle recovery.

The ACSM suggests that during exercise the beverage consumed should contain carbohydrates, sodium and potassium.

Natural electrolyte options

Proper hydration restoration can be found in some standard sports drinks, however, in an effort to avoid white granulated sugar and unknown ingredients I chose whole, organic foods and drinks.

As I prepare for a long run, I pack my water bottle with diluted organic coconut water [two parts water, one part coconut water].

Other electrolyte-filled natural options include lemon water with honey and a touch of salt, orange-infused water or electrolyte-filled snacks.

My favorite go-to electrolyte-packed foods to eat during a run include: bananas, raisins and oranges.

Electrolyte 2

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy

Each of these foods contain electrolytes and carbohydrate to allow your body to properly restore the lost water and minerals levels – while also providing needed energy to sustain you.

Most fruits and vegetables contain electrolytes and are filled with water, allowing most raw fruit and vegetables to also serve as a great electrolyte-packed choice.

Group of different fruit and vegetables

Photo taken from enjoyagreatlife.com

Aside from natural foods, there are also many items available to purchase that offer electrolytes. Options include salt tablets, electrolyte-filled chews and gu, as well as electrolyte tablets and powders.

Vega

Photo taken from shopmyvega.com

(If I were to purchase a electrolyte item instead of eating it through food, I would purchase it from the Vega company)

I personally favor natural foods during my runs. However, if a supplement or tablet is more appealing to you, give it a try!

Since incorporating coconut water into my workout routines I have felt much more energy, I have been able to recover more quickly and I have completely avoided brain fog towards the end of my runs.

Coconut water

Photo taken from makecoffee.com

I inspire you to be stronger than your excuses – start exercising for at least a few minutes each day, gradually increase your rate each week, and never give up on yourself.

“Run when you can, walk if you have to, crawl if you must; just never give up,” Ultramarathon champion Dean Karrnazes said.

Remember, hydration is incredibly important — even if you are not an exercise enthusiast. We all should be conscious of our water consumption and never wait till we are thirsty to start drinking water.

Coconut Water Tip: When choosing the type of coconut water that you are going to consume, follow the Food Babe’s advice on the healthiest, purest options –>http://bit.ly/1l3r61i

Best,

Angela Joy

Originally published in Night & Day Magazine

A little organization & positive reinforcement can make a world of difference

By: Angela Joy

What does your work space look like?
Does it promote productivity? Do you feel motivated?

Each office has its own look and feel, depending on the type of profession, office space/location and person’s interest.

What every office may need, regardless of its look and feel, is some needed organization along with a taste of positive reinforcement.

Angela Joy’s Wall of Motivation – alongside a clear and organized workspace

Organization&Positive Reinforcement

Organization:

The photo above is an example of my current desk/office space.

All of the notes, paperwork, and books have been removed – only allowing items that I am using at the moment to remain.

Items, books, and paper work that were previously placed on the desk have been removed and organized in folders.

Now that my workspace is clear and organized, I feel refreshed and prepared to work.

More often than not people do not take the time to clear their workspace – leaving scattered paper work, pens, notes and to-do lists.

The result of dismissing time to organize your desk may lead to unproductivity, confusion, stress and aggravation – without you even realizing it.

Careerbuilder.com states that the benefits of an organized desk/office include:

  • Increased efficiency
  • Reduced stress levels
  • An enhanced image at work
  • The ability to retrieve forgotten/lost items
  • The opportunity to gain a sense of accomplishment

Information obtained from:  http://cb.com/1FQDyP2

Shape.com, also agrees. The health and exercise magazine printed a recent article proving the same facts: http://bit.ly/1DC4Tl1

If you are facing issues with lack of organization in the workplace, refer to TimeManagementSuccess.com, where they have provided tips for you to get organized and achieve ultimate productivity: http://bit.ly/1ACLnoX

Positive Reinforcement:

While organizing my new workspace I thought about different ways to decorate the area.

Have you ever heard that if you surround yourself with good people you will become a good person?

Well in deciding how to decorate the space I thought why not surround myself with encouraging and inspirational quotes?

As a result I began researching some quotes that are important to me and began collecting them. Over time I acquired enough of them that I started printing them to place on my wall.

The photo above shows the quotes I have placed at my workspace, I also placed quotes and encouraging words all throughout my bedroomtherefore completely surrounding myself with encouragement in every direction.

While placing these notes throughout my room I then decided to write down my weekly, yearly and life goals.

I then taped my goals next to my calendar, mirror and next to my door.

The goals are a constant reminder of the plans, dreams and hopes that I am working towards each day.

This effort has been extremely beneficial for me. Each time that I feel down I subconscious read the notes in my room while getting dressed or putting on makeup – and my mood and perspective is automatically changed.

I advise everyone, no matter how successful or not successful that you are to try this exercise.

We all have goals and hopes in life and it is important to remember and work towards them each day!

A  quote to get your own “Wall of Motivation” started is this:

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”
-Harriet Tubman

-Angela Joy

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