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Angela Joy Health & Fitness

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This is THE Year: You Will Accomplish Your Goal

You cann

It is a new year, which means a new you. A you who is not afraid of a challenge. This is the year. You are going to overcome your fears and accomplish your goals.

You ARE going to complete a half marathon!

The half marathon race has become one of the MOST popular events in the world – with hundreds of people completing the challenge every weekend.

According to Competitor.com, the half marathon has been the fastest growing race distance in the U.S. for the past 12 consecutive years.

“And it’s not showing signs of slowing down anytime soon,”Competitor.com writer Mario Fraioli stated. 

Fraiolo compares the half marathon to the third bowl of porridge referenced in Goldilocks, “It’s neither too short nor too long, it’s just right.”

The Half Marathon; What is it Exactly? 

  • The half marathon race is a total of 13.1 miles. It is half of the full marathon distance, which is 26.2.
  • Training for a half marathon should consist of about 3-4 runs per week, gradually increasing in mile distance throughout the training schedule.
  • Based on each individual’s needs and time commitments, a training schedule is made up of different run types, times and distances – with a long run on the weekend.
  • For those who want to improve their fitness and running abilities, cross training and resistance training can also be implemented.

Spring is the perfect time to run in a half marathon and there are a ton available!

If planning on running in a spring half marathon, February is the perfect month to start training.

If running is new to you, or you don’t know where to start I am offering a special
Half Marathon Training Package Deal this month
to help you kick-start the New Year
& accomplish your goals!

You cannn

Personalized Half Marathon Training Plan (Monthly)
-Customized training schedule-based on specific goals, athletic ability & schedule
-Running tips and advice
-All of your running questions answered via email
-Support and motivation along the way!
-Nutrition advice and assistance
-Race day tips
-Race day checklist
-And more!

All for $30 per month 

Personalized Half Marathon Training Plan (3-month) 
-3 month training schedule based on specific goals, athletic ability and schedule
-Training tips and advice
-Support and motivation
-List of race day tips

All for $30

To get started, or learn more, contact me at ajciroalo@gmail.com.
I would LOVE to help you get started and achieve this exceptional goal!

Believe in yourself, I believe in you. Let’s do this!

Contact me today!
angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

Let’s Train together
Trick or Trot_Oct 25 2015

 

How Cross-Training Can Improve Runner Performance

By: Angela Ciroalo

In this article I will share my experience with over-training and how it led me to recognize the importance of cross training for runners and athletes alike.

2015-08-02_14.04.11

How Over-Training Led Me to Love Cross-Training

 

In the beginning of the summer I, like many other runners, selected my next big race. I chose a fall marathon to motivate me to train throughout the summer.

I excitedly marked the date of the race down on my calendar and counted the amount of weeks I had to train. I studied the course. I read the race reviews. I even purchased new shoes and shoe-inserts to ensure injury prevention.

Since my last marathon in November I continued a frequent running schedule. I ran one high mileage run, one speed workout, and one interval workout, per week.  I felt great and fully prepared to begin training for my next marathon, or so I thought.

I was nearly finished with my first week of training when I ran into an unexpected road block. I turned the corner to finish the last straight-away of my final run for the week when pain shot down my iliotibial band muscle and down into my knee. I ran a few more steps and the pain did not dismiss, therefore I decided it was best for me to walk.

I felt defeated. I wondered what I did wrong and whether or not this would prevent me from competing in my next marathon.

Without jumping to conclusion, I decided to take it easy for the next few days. The following day I attended a Pilates class.

The day after, I ran on an elliptical.

The third day I went for a bike ride.

By day four I noticed I was sore from the different types of exercises that I had been doing. The soreness led me to a realization; I had been so focused on running to prepare for the next race that I was completely ignoring the muscles in the rest of my body.

My main focus was the amount of miles I ran per week and the time that I was able to complete each run in.

The aches and pains I felt were all overlooked. The monotony of my workouts was overlooked. And, most importantly, the stress my body was feeling from only running – was overlooked.

I, like many runners, was caught up with the ambition to run farther and faster. I had become so engulfed with perfecting my running that the other areas of my bodies were dismissed, leading to an overuse injury.

Why Cross Train?

According to marathon runner and author Matthew Fitzgerald cross training for runners can aid in preventing injuries, create quicker rehabilitation time, create greater aerobic fitness, increases the runner’s power, and improve the runner’s efficiency.

Some runners believe that there is no replacement for running. This approach may work for some, however I found in my experience that it did not work for me.

I experienced a very common overuse injury which I am working to rehabilitate and strengthen through cycling, shorter runs, Cybex® Arc training, strength training and Pilates exercises.

None of these exercises were included in my previous training plan. Since incorporating these exercises I feel stronger, faster, and as if my overall fitness level has improved dramatically.

In addition to incorporating these change in my training schedule I decided to run a half marathon instead of a full marathon this fall.

The cross training activities that I will have been working on are only a few of the many exercises available.

Types of Cross Training

Cross Training

Photo taken from completetrackandfield.com

The website Marathontraining.com lists several types of cross training that specifically benefit runners.

Cross training exercises recommended for runners by marathontraining.com include; cycling, swimming, the Elliptical trainer, Cybex® Arc trainer, deep water running, an Ergometer (rowing) machine, Nordic Track Ski-Simulator machine, Stair-Master, Versa-Climber, walking and strength training.

The American Running Association [ARA] references studies that proved the benefit of cycling, weight training and walking for runners.

The ARA found in a study completed by the University of Utah that interval cycling workouts increase speed without the impact of running sprints.

The ARA found in a study completed by Ron Johnston at the University of New Hampshire in Durham that resistance weight training in the upper and lower parts of the body increased runner’s speed in a 10 kilometer run.

The ARA stated that walking is another beneficial activity for runners. The ARA referenced the Jeff Galloway Marathon Training Program, which educates runners on the benefits of walking and running slowly, and found that walking can improve runner’s endurance.

Another area of cross-training to consider is taking exercise classes. Activities such as Pilates, yoga, Zumba, cardio exercise classes and aqua classes, will each offer different benefits to runners.

Each of the cross training activities listed are beneficial to runner’s seeking to avoid injury and improve fitness level.

We are all different; the cross training exercise that works best for you may not work for me.  Try giving each of the different types a try, allowing yourself to explore what works best for you and your body.

Inspiration ❤ 

This month’s inspirational running quote to get you started towards better health comes from runner, author and columnist John Hanc,”At least 99-percent of running is just showing up, getting out there and putting one foot in front of the other.”

This article was adapted from an article published in Night & Day Magazine

Running motivation

Capable of so much more

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings,

Angela Joy

Runner’s Tips for Avoiding Heat Illness This Summer

By: Angela Ciroalo

Things are heating up at the Jersey Shore – quite literally actually.
Summer has finally set in and runners alike are enjoying every bit of it.

Despite the welcoming temperatures and sun’s refreshing beams, there are some factors that must be considered before jumping onto the pavement to run these next two months.

Jumping on the beach

Photo taken from http://www.philly.com

Heat Illness
Heat illness can occur to anyone participating in outdoor activity during a hot day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] reported that between 1999 and 2010 an average of 618 people died in the United States each year due to a health-related illness.

The CDC further stated that heat-related deaths are more common in the United States than deaths due to tornadoes, earthquakes, floods and hurricanes combined.

HOT running
Photo taken from philly.com

The cause of a heat illness is often attributed to the body being unable to regulate the internal temperature controls, medicinenet.com reported in a June 2015 article titled, Hypothermia.

During high temperatures, the body will attempt to cool itself down through the evaporation of sweat.

Issues occur, however, when conditions such as high temperatures and humidity levels prevent sweat from evaporating, leaving the body in an overheated state.

Sweat is unable to evaporate as quickly in high heat/humid conditions, preventing heat from being released.

Types of Heat Illnesses
There are several types of heat-related illnesses.

Heat-related illnesses include; heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hypernatremia, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].

Heat Illness
Photo taken from kidshealth.org

Heat cramps are pains most commonly in the quadriceps, hamstrings and calves, caused by dehydration, electrolyte loss or inadequate blood flow to muscles.

Heat syncope is the result of decreased blood flow to the brain.

Heat exhaustion is a shock-like condition caused due to the body’s inability to acclimate to the high temperature and level of exercise, combined.

Hyponatremia, or water intoxication, is the attributed to excess water intake without proper electrolyte consumption.

Common symptoms and signs of heat-related illness includes; profuse sweating, dizziness, faintness, increased heart rate, nausea, vomiting, headache, extreme thirst, chills,  and even loss of consciousness.

Heat Illnesses
P
hoto taken from uchicago.edu

The most severe of the heat-related illnesses is heat stroke.

Heat stroke occurs when the body temperature is too high and the thermal regulatory mechanism is overwhelmed, according to the HSCC.

Heat stroke can occur due to fluid depletion or inability to absorb fluid.

Key signs include hot skin, pale skin, high pulse, high respiratory rate, decreased urine output, a temperature over 104 or 105 decreased Fahrenheit and pupils that are dilated or unresponsive.

Treating Heat Illness
Most of the above stated heat illnesses can be treated by moving the ill person to a cool, shaded area, placing a wet towel on their skin, elevating the feet, and offering them water and/or an electrolyte-filled beverage.

In the event of a more severe heat illness, call emergency personnel immediately.

Heat ill
Photo taken from constantcontact.com

Tips to Avoid Heat Illness
There are a number of ways to avoid heat-related illness during exercise this summer.

The first and foremost action should be, however, to check the heat index.

The heat index is the air temperature and humidity levels – combined, to provide a description of how the temperature will feel, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].
The heat index will determine whether or not it is safe to participate in outdoor activity.

Heat Index
Photo taken from wsu.edu

When temperatures exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit, runners should not partake in outdoor exercise.

To avoid the steaming temperatures of the hot summer days runners can exercise in the early morning or late night hours.

If temperatures are hot, but not hot enough to refrain from participating in exercise, runners should hydrate well throughout the day and during their run, wear lightweight clothing, and exercise for a shorter and slower distance than they regularly do.

Safety precautions should always be taken during hot temperatures in an effort to avoid injury and illness.

Avoid Heat Injury
Photo taken from twu.edu

Angela’s Summer Running Plan
This summer I will be training for the Atlantic City Marathon, which means I will be outside running – a lot.

ACMarathon
Photo taken from teamintraining.org

In an effort to avoid risk of injury I will be running after sunset and hydrating with additional electrolytes and water throughout each day.

During shorter distance runs I often do not take a water bottle or Camelback water pack with me, although due to the higher temperatures I will.

Taking precaution during exercise is important – not only to avoid injury – but also to improve performance.

The heat can have a severe impact on a runner’s performance, which creates a greater reason to take precaution during these beautiful, hot summer months.

A great quote to get you running this month is from marathon record breaker Bill Rodgers, “Anyone can be a runner. We were meant to move. We were meant to run. It is the easiest sport.”

This article was previously published in Night & Day Magazine

If you have been running outside, share with me some of your warm weather outdoor running tips/suggestions. I would love to hear from you!

Check back in soon to hear more about my training schedule and plans!

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings.
Best,

Angela Joy

The healthy way to fuel for long distance running

By: Angela Joy

As a runner, or exercise enthusiast, the foods that you eat should be taken just as seriously as the shoes you wear and the time you finish in.

Unfortunately, proper diet is not always top priority.

According to Erin Strout of Running Times Magazine, runners continue to follow the age-old beliefs that eating large amounts of pasta the night before, chugging bottles of sports drinks or following fad diets, will improve performance.

However, what runners are beginning to recognize more commonly is that high quality protein, fats, carbohydrates, electrolytes and superfoods, each play an intrical role in fueling a succesful athlete.

Healthy Foods

Photo taken from wicklowpartnership.ie

Ms. Stout writes in the Running Times magazine, proper nutrition and hydration are critical components for improved running capabilities.

Upon first beginning my running career I was not aware of the importance of a healthy diet.

I maintained a seemingly healthy diet, although had not true idea of what health really was.

I followed the all of the age-old runner beliefs, leading me to suffer during my first half marathon race.

It wasn’t long after when I recognized the importance of nutrition and consuming healthy organic whole foods as a runner.

During my second half marathon I cut my time by 15 minutes, finished strong, and recovered almost immediately after.

A year or so later, I took on the next challenge – running a full marathon.

I began my training unaware of how often or what types of foods I would need while running a distance longer than 90 minutes.

I can still remember coming home from my first 15 mile run. I was ecstatic, but once I met my living room I was done for the day.

I went to bed that night with an incredible headache and woke up the next day feeling worse than ever.

It was at this point that I looked to ultramarathon champion, and author of the book, “Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness,” Scott Jurek.

SCott Jurek

Photo taken from Twitter.com

Jurek is known for his victories in nearly every elite ultra trail and road event. He is most commonly recognized for his seven straight victories at the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, his record-breaking Badwater 135-mile Ultramarathon win, and his historic 153-mile Spartathalon win.

Jurek explains the importance of eating carbohydrates prior to a run, eating carbohydrates during a run that is longer than 90 minutes, and eating protein 30 minutes after a run to restore your energy levels and avoid fatigue.

Jurek follows a whole foods plant-based diet, and suggests that runners eat a variety of organic whole foods such as grains, legumes, green vegetables and fruits.

Running

In reaction to reading Mr. Jurek’s book, and seeking guidance from other professional runners, I created this training guide to prepare for long runs:

Day before:
Avoid carbo-loading the night before.
Instead, focus on fueling your body on quality protein, unsaturated fats and carbohydrates throughout the day.
Your body will store the protein, fats and carbohyrates and utilize them the following day.
Also make sure to allow the body proper time to digest all of the food you eat, prior to race morning. In other words, try not to eat too late at night.

A sample pre-race day, or pre-long run, meal for me would include:
Organic brown rice
Black beans
Avocado
Tomato
The day before I also snack on different fruits and nuts between meals.

Morning before: Before embarking on a long run it is best to wake up at least 30 minutes to one hour before running to allow yourself to eat and digest the food.

Each runner’s stomach will handle foods and digestion differently, therefore trial and error is key – the same goes with foods eaten during the run.

Carbohydrates are key the day of a run.

istock_000017061174small

My pre-run meal often consists of a piece of cinnamon raisin Ezekiel toast with peanut butter and a banana or orange. If I wake up early, I will eat a small bowl of oatmeal with organic blueberries.

During the run: A runner only needs to consume food if they are partaking in exercise longer than 90 minutes.

If running for longer than 90 minutes it is best to eat every 30 minutes, or so, to fully restore the body’s glycogen levels.

Most professional athletes suggest eating at least 30 grams of carbohydrates every 30 minutes.

Jurek created a conversion that meets each runner’s specific needs through relying on the runner’s weight.

The runner’s body weight, divided by 2.2, multiplied by .7, equates to the amount of carbohydrates consumed while running.

Jurek’s conversion: (Body weight/2.2) x .7 = grams of carbohydrates

I weigh 130 pounds, therefore my conversion would appear as; (130/2.2) x .7 = 41.4.

What to eat on the run:

Many runners reach for sports gels to meet their carbohydrate needs while exercising.

I opted for the natural whole foods remedies.

A few examples of foods I consume while running include;
Bananas
Figs
Organic fruit baby foods
Dates

While running I eat one item every 30 to 40 minutes and drink water after every mile.

sproutbabyfood

Photo take from: livingrichwithcoupons.com

Angela’s Tip:
Bananas are a common go-to food for me while running. I often peel the banana right before the run and place it in a plastic bag untouched. I will mush it up right before I eat it to allow easier digestion and carbohydrate absorption.

Post-Run: After completing a run it is time for the body to refuel, recover and prepare for the next run.

Physiologist Deborah Shulman concluded in an article on Active.com titled, “Get enough protein post-workout,” that it is important to consume carbohydrates and protein within 30 minutes of completing endurance exercise.

She explained that the nutrients consumed after exercise will fend off fatigue and promote recovery.

Ms. Schulman suggests that 20 grams of protein is optimal after completing an endurance exercise activity.

She said 20 grams can often be found in one scoop of protein powder.

What to eat after a run: Eating can be difficult after undergoing a sustained, difficult workout. My solution is to reach for a protein-packed smoothie.

I often consume one full cup of a protein smoothie after each run.

Angela 3

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy

My favorite post-run smoothie; Blueberry, banana and flax seed smoothie

  • Banana
  • Rice milk – you can use any kind of milk
  • Frozen blueberries
  • Hemp protein
  • One tablespoon of crushed flax seeds
  • One teaspoon of cinnamon

If you prefer a sweet smoothie, include one teaspoon of honey or maple syrup to the mix.

Finding Inspiration

A quote that gets me through long, strenuous runs is one of Jurek’s common phrases, “Sometimes, you just do things.”

The quote resonates with me to the fact that I don’t have a specific explanation of why I run other than the fact that I simply enjoy it.

Truly, we don’t need an explanation for why we do things that make us happy – it is just important that we go out there and do them.

Don’t worry about what people think or say – just do it.

I challenge you to go out and do something that you love for the simple reason that, “Sometimes we just do things.”

Blog Post Takeaway:

Healthy Food

Photo taken from:socialdashboard.com

Have you ever heard of the expression, “You are what you eat,” well, my motto is, “Your performance is only as good as the food that you eat.”

Therefore, make sure that you are eating well!

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. I hope it was helpful! Please share your feedback, comments, questions.

❤ Wishing you lots of love, joy and blessings

-Angela Joy

Information obtained from:

  1. http://running.competitor.com/2014/04/inside-the-magazine/the-long-run/the-long-run-eating-on-the-run_28754
  2. http://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-for-runners/fueling-facts
  3. http://www.active.com/nutrition/articles/get-enough-protein-post-workout
  4. Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness by Scott Jurek with Steve Friedman
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