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One-Week Whole Foods Cleanse: Preparation

Blog Post # 4: Properly Preparing for the Cleanse

This post is part of a series of blog post articles that will/are being posted throughout the week in preparation of the cleanse which will occur next week. You are welcome to join and/or follow along! Please notify me if you are interested in joining. I will be happy to offer assistance and guidance along the way!
Contact: angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

wholee foods

If you have chosen to participate in the one-week cleanse it is best to fully prepare for the cleanse.

Preparation can be done through:

  • beginning to eat less packaged and processed foods
  • eating less animal products
  • eating more fruits and vegetables
  • drinking more water
  • purchasing foods that will be eaten during the cleanse
  • finding recipes to make during the cleanse
  • planning out meals you would like to eat during the cleanse
  • setting a goal/intention for the cleanse
  • having a journal ready to track progress

Your Healthy Eating Grocery List

Vegetables

  • Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Peppers
  • Carrots
  • Squash
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Onions
  • Garlic

Fruit

  • Berries
  • Bananas
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Avocado
  • Oranges
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons

Grains

  • Quinoa
  • Brown rice
  • Millet
  • Barley
  • Oatmeal

Beans/Legumes

  • Black beans
  • Chickpeas
  • White beans
  • Lentils
  • Azuki
  • Kidney beans

Herbs and Spices

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Chili flakes
  • Cumin
  • Cardamom
  • Cinnamon
  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Thyme

Nuts/Seeds

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Flax seed
  • Chia seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Cashews
  • Brazil nuts

Click here for a printable shopping list: power-plate-shopping-list

Whole Foods Cleanse

Will you join me in this special one-week cleanse?

  • Who: YOU are invited to participate?
  • What: One-Week Cleanse made up of primarily whole foods, no processed or packaged foods.
  • When: Monday, February 29 – Sunday, March 6
  • Additional information and instruction will be provided throughout the week.
  • Free guidance and support will be offered, by me, as needed 🙂
*Note: This cleanse does not include any animal products. If you choose to consume animal products during the cleanse that is up to you. However, I do suggest that you choose to refrain from consuming animal products during the cleanse and determine how your body feels upon completion of the cleanse* 

Please contact Angela Joy with any questions or concerns! If you are interested in participating, please contact Angela Joy at angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

❤ Sending you love, joy, blessings and health,

Angela Joy xo

Inspiring Thoughts and a Positive Outlook on Life

I was generously asked by blog writer Michael of “The Pantsless Bear” blog to provide my input on several health and wellness-related topics.

I have included the questions and responses below for you to read through.

I am incredibly grateful that Michael has asked me to share my input on these topics.

Through each response my intention was to inspire and motivate positive change within each of my readers ❤

If you have any additional questions, or would like to conduct and interview with me for your blog, please comment below. Or, send me an email at angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com. I look forward to hearing from you!

Positivity

Q: You mention that it’s important to ‘live in the moment.’ This is a philosophy preached by both traditional buddhists and new-age mystics alike. The problem with ‘living in the moment’ is that people can’t seem to stop thinking about the past or the future. You advised people to ‘put their cameras away,’ which was wonderful, but what other things can they do to stay ‘centred?’

A: Living in the moment is a feeling that many of us have lost touch with. As a result of the technology and quickly moving world that we live in, our minds are usually off somewhere else while we are currently engaged in a task.

Many of us do not even realize this is happening. In an effort to encourage this behavior, society has idolized multitasking. We often hear others state how they were able to complete three tasks at once in a matter of only several minutes. This is great, but did you complete that task to the best of your ability? Do you even remember actually completing the task? Were you present during the task, or absent focusing on the next task at hand?

Multi-tasking is causing us to spread ourselves thin and lose sight of what is important in life.

An example to better explain my statement is when you see someone photographing a moment rather than experiencing it.

My best advice for those seeking to become more present in their lives is to first recognize what it means to be present. Understand the concept of being present and why it is important.

Then you can begin to recognize when you are not present.

This recognition alone will help you to reconnect with yourself, your actions and thoughts – while learning to enjoy and remember important moments in your lifeJ


Q: Whenever I eat cake at work I feel awful afterwards. Why do we seem to ‘crash’ after eating heavily refined foods such as cake and pasta?

A: When we eat refined foods that are high in sugar and lacking in nutrients our bodies go into a bit of a shock, which is followed by a low. This process is better known as hypoglycemina.

Foods that contain fiber and nutrition take much longer to be digested and absorbed into the body. Refined foods that are high in sugar do not contain much, other than sugar. Therefore they are broken down and absorbed by the body very quickly. This quick absorption process causes the blood sugar to spike up high – your hormones love it, your taste buds love it, and you feel great. Then the blood sugar drops. You feel tired, sluggish and unhappy. This is due to the jolt that the body just experienced leaving your hormones completely out of whack and your body craving more sugar.

In an effort to prevent this from occurring we should make every effort to consume foods that serve our body’s needs, and are made up of nutrition and fiber. Our bodies need food that contains nutritional value, vitamins, minerals and fiber to allow them to function at peak levels .

Although most of us do not like to believe this; food was created to serve our body, not just our taste buds. The food we eat becomes our cells, organs, skin, hair, and nails. If we want strong organs, blood, bones, hair and nails we must consume foods that support their functioning, not deprave them of what they need – which is what highly refined, sugar-filled foods do.

Berrries

Q: You preach a common phrase repeated among gurus in the wellness community that people should ‘love themselves.’ As much as it’s a good, marketable phrase, it’s not very practical. What does ‘loving yourself’ mean and how can people learn to love themselves?’

Loving yourself is waking up in the morning, staring in the mirror, and smiling at the person staring back at you. This may sound absurd, and even impossible for some, but by all means loving yourself is possible!

We are all wonderful and amazing human beings who were created for a specific reason and purpose. Yes, YOU were created for a very special purpose.

If you do not agree with me, and you do not think that your body is not all that great, then think about this:

–          Every second your body is producing 25 million new cells

–          A red blood cell moves through your body in less than 20 seconds

–          Your nerve impulses travel at a speed of 249 miles per hour.

–          Your heart beats 100,000 times every day – which is 30 million times per year!

–          Your blood travels 60,000 miles through the body every day!

–          Your lungs inhale two million liters of air every day – without you ever stopping to think about it.

–          One square inch of your hand contains nine feet of blood vessels, 600 pain sensors, 9,000 serve ending, 36 heat sensors and 75 pressure sensors.

Still think you are unimportant, useless, ugly, boring, uninteresting? I do not think so.

YOU, not anyone else, was created at the specific moment that your father’s sperm entered your mother’s egg. This is not by chance.

So what isn’t to love?

Your body is such a gift. Cherish your gift, love it, feed it and move it – and in return it will take care of you.

Self car and love

Q: Many of our married friends are 30 pushing 70. One unnamed 32 year old individual looks rather like Prince Phillip (the old Prince Phillip, not the young one). People seem to get settled into married life and find themselves on the couch every night eating mountains of choc-coated almonds. Why do you think some people in long term relationships discard health and wellbeing?

A: Regardless of age people find themselves becoming complacent. They have all that they need to get by, therefore they choose to live their current life (regardless of the monotony and unhappiness that they may be feeling) because they are afraid of change, they don’t know how to make a change, or they are so tired and stressed that they can’t even bear the thought of doing something different.

The biggest of these three that I have mentioned, I truly believe, is stress.

We are under constant stress from all areas of our lives. When it comes time to think about making changes or doing something out of the ordinary we are afraid this will create more work which we cannot handle (or, feel like we cannot handle because we are so overwhelmed).

This is better known as burnout.

Burnout is felt in all aspects of our life.

We feel so overwhelmed that we do not see how we could possible find the time to exercise, eat healthy, make dinner, spend quality time with friends and family, or do anything else that supports our well-being.

The truth of the matter is; you have time for whatever you WANT to make time for.

What do you consider your priorities in life? These are the things that get done. If health and wellness is not a priority in your life it will be ignored and you will spend valuable years of your life sitting on a couch eating ice cream.

Every day YOU choose how you will spend your day. Every day you have a choice.

If you want to change, you have to truly want to make that change.

If you make change a priority, you will have time for it.

Healthy Food

Q: As a fitness and wellbeing writer, what are your thoughts on the various illnesses that affect obese people, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Are refined foods really responsible for the rise in these illnesses?

A: Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the many digestive issues that people are facing all over the world.

The health of our digestive system is one of the most important components of our bodies. When our digestive system is not functioning properly our entire body will begin to function improperly – because it is not able to fully absorb and digest the nutrients our body needs correctly.

While there are other areas of life that also impact our health and digestion (stress, lifestyle, environmental exposures, and much more) diet and exercise is a large piece to the puzzle.

If someone is facing a digestive issue the first thing they should do is seek guidance to improve the health of their gut through a nutrient-rich diet, filled with healthy gut bacteria (probiotics).

Probiotics offer the body healthy bacteria which supports digestive health. Anyone facing any type of digestive issue should consider a healthy dose of probiotics which can be consumed through their food and through supplements.

Q: So I tried to lose weight through long distance walking, but found it utterly useless and not tiresome at all. In fact, I came to the realisation that the forced marching of POW’s in WWII wouldn’t have been nearly as traumatic as the so called ‘survivors’ say it was. So why is a 20-30 minute run is so much more beneficial to a 4 hour walk?

A: When the body walks at a steady, comfortable pace the metabolic system is not really altered.

When the body picks up the pace for a jog the heart pumps faster, the lungs pump more oxygen, healthy hormones are released, the body sweats out toxins, and much more. This process supports weight loss. A steady state walk will strengthen the leg’s slow twitch muscle fibers while slightly improving the cardiorespiratory system. The same benefits are possible when walking, although on a much smaller scale that may not be noticeable.

If you are hoping to lose weight try adding in job intervals. Pick up the pace for only a few seconds at a time throughout the walk. Get the heart rate up and push yourself to the point that you want to stop. Try to continue these bursts of fast walking or jogging throughout your walk, and each time you go for a walk try to jog a little longer.

Over time you will build up your cardiorespiratory ability, your heart will begin pumping more blood, happy hormones will be released, you will work up a little sweat, and you will build up strength. Intervals will help support weight loss. Steady state exercise is nowhere as effective.

Running

Q: During long bike rides, I’ve often found myself ruminating on why certain friends didn’t show up to my birthday last year. Finally, when the exercise is done, I return home in a worse mood than when I left. Our minds can be chaotic, especially when the body is under great physical stress. So how does someone manage their thoughts while training?

A: Try to focus on the positives!

When we endure long bouts of exercise we have time to think. You can use this time to think about anything you would like.

Your thoughts could be positive or negative. If you find yourself constantly thinking of negative thoughts this may be a sign to you that you have some negativity you are holding on to which is preventing you from being positive.

Work through the negativity and make an effort to find the good. Find the good in the situation, the upside, the positive, the other side of the coin.

Find a way to turn a bad situation into a good one. You are on a long ride, why not take the time to brainstorm.

Believe it or not this is an incredibly healthy process. You are on the right track.

Long bike rides are the perfect time to connect with your true self. Try to make the experience a positive one.

Positive

Q: Okay, this is an important one. What can you tell us about the importance of gut bacteria for both physical health and mental wellbeing?

A: As I mentioned earlier, our gut health is incredibly important for our overall health. Gut health is linked to our body’s functioning as well as our thoughts, actions and moods.

The gut is commonly referred to as the second brain.

When the gut is unhealthy, food is not properly digested, and food is not moving through quickly – our brain often times becomes foggy and slow moving as well, creating lethargy, lack of motivation and a drop in our mood.

If you want to feel better, have more energy, and improve your mood and outlook on life, improve the health of your digestive system. This can be done by eating healthy WHOLE foods (vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes) that have not been altered and no ingredients have been added to them. Try crowding in these fresh, whole foods in an effort to crowd out unhealthy, processed foods that were made in a factory.

If the food was made in a factory and not from the ground, it will not support a healthy body and gut.

To supercharge the health of your gut, try these six tips:

  1. Eat fresh whole foods that are high in water content
  2. Drink 1 full glass of water in the morning, at lunch, and at dinner
  3. Exercise! Move the body and release toxins
  4. Sleep 7-8 hours per night
  5. Consume a probiotic-rich diet, or supplement
  6. Drink hot water or tea to promote positive gut flora

GBOMBSd

Q: I particularly enjoyed your post ‘Your Guide to Nutrition Packed Foods’ and found that providing professional advice from a real physician to be invaluable. Many quacks on the internet provide ‘expert evidence,’ advising people that formulated ‘weight loss drinks’ and expensive vitamin pills are the key to lasting health. Is supplementation really necessary or can we get everything we need essential vegetables?

A: For the most part we can get what we need from vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds and legumes.

However, based on the location you live and the foods you have access to, or the resources you have access to, it may be difficult to obtain all of the nutrients your body needs.

For example, I live in New Jersey (in America) and during the winter it is very difficult for me to absorb the amount of vitamin D that I need. Therefore, I supplement this nutrient.

I chose to supplement this nutrient because I know that I am deficient in it. I recommend that anyone interested in purchasing a supplement, first go to their doctor and request a full panel blood test to determine which nutrients they are deficient or low in.

Request that your hormone levels are checked as well as all of your vitamin and mineral levels.

Once you receive the results check to see what areas you are lacking.

Once you learn what you are lacking make an effort to eat foods that are high in this nutrient – while also supplementing.

Health Happy

Q: Finally, what is your philosophy on life?

A: My philosophy is to live every single say with gratefulness. Everything that I do, say, or think is based on the notion that I am grateful to be alive, to have all that I was given, to do all that I can do, and to have achieved all that I have achieved. Every day is a miracle! If take the time to remember this we will begin to see the positive and wonderful aspects of our life, as well as the world around us.

I also truly believe that everything happens for a reason and we were all created for a specific and divine purpose.

Our mission in life is to discover that purpose and live it out to the best of our ability each day.

My purpose is to deliver joy to others. My name is Angela Joy; which translates to ‘messenger of joy.’ Before ever thinking of the meaning of my name I knew that I wanted to bring happiness into the lives of others (regardless of if it was through a smile, holding the door, or offering a kind word).Years later I put the two together and realized that this indeed is my purpose! I couldn’t be more grateful ❤

Take a moment and ponder the thought; what is your purpose? What are your strengths? What do you enjoy doing? What brings you joy and fulfillment?

 

I loved the opportunity to share with all of you. If you enjoyed my responses and would like to connect with me, please email me at angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com, follow my blog at www.angelajoyhealthfitness.com, or follow me on Facebook AngelaJoyHealth&Fitness.

Please share your thoughts, reactions and feedback below. I look forward to hearing and connecting with you! 

 

❤ Sending you love, joy and blessings,

xo Angela Joy

Quick, Efficient, Fat-Burning Exercise!

By: Angela Ciroalo

Interval Training Benefits
Image taken from fix.com

Winter has arrived, and although the weather outside is cold your workouts do not necessarily need to be put on hold.

In fact, depending on the type of indoor workout you choose, you may even have the opportunity to save time, increase your speed and endurance, and even lose weight.

Trivial to what many believe indoor cardio workouts do not equate to easier workouts.

There are many different options available when selecting an indoor activity.

There are a variety of options including; cycling, swimming, water running, circuit training, indoor running, and even plyometric drills.

Each of these activities can be completed through traditional steady-state bouts of exercise, or for improved results they can be done through an interval style method.

Interval training is a common form of training among athletes and experienced exercisers.

However, gyms, fitness instructors and personal trainers are beginning to take notice and incorporate interval training into traditional workouts and classes.

Interval Training
Image taken from washington.edu

What is interval training?

The nationally recognized health and fitness certification organization the American Council on Exercise [ACE] defines interval training as a system of organized cardiorespiratory training consisting of bouts of short duration, high-intensity exercise intervals with periods of lower intensity active recovery.

According to a 2014 American College of Sports Medicine [ACSM] consumer information committee report the benefits of interval training include; improved aerobic and anaerobic fitness, decreased blood pressure levels, improved overall cardiovascular health, improved insulin sensitivity, improved cholesterol profiles, and decreased abdominal fat.

Interval training is also well-known for the increased caloric burn, decreased time spent exercising, ability to improve metabolic disorders, as wells as the increased athletic performance and speed that it creates.

There are many types of interval workouts that can be completed, each varying in distance, amount of interval sessions, and length of time.

The amount of time and /or amount of interval sessions should be selected based on the individual’s athletic ability and goals.

Interval training can be catered to people of all fitness levels and conditions – with great results seen in those seeking to prevent or reverse metabolic disease.

If done correctly and consistently, interval training has the ability to improve insulin sensitivity among those with high blood sugar through allowing the body to better utilize glucose in the body.

How does interval training work?

Once an interval training sessions is completed the body will continue to burn calories for a longer period of time. The excess post-exercise oxygen consumption [EPOC] is a two-hour period of time where the body works to restore itself back to pre-exercise levels, the ACSM report states.

Therefore EPOC creates between 6 to 15 percent greater calorie burn once an interval session is completed.

Intervals can be completed through a variety of outdoor and indoor activities including outdoor running and cycling or indoor treadmills, ellipticals, stair-climbers and stationary bikes.

Intervals
Image taken from colpts.com

How to create an interval training workout

There are several components to consider when selecting an interval training workout. These factors include type, time, intensity and frequency.

Better known as the American Council on Exercise FITT principle

TYPE: Begin by first selecting the type of interval workout that you would like to complete [cycling, running, water running, etc.].

TIME: Secondly, select the amount of time you would like to spend completing the workout. The ACSM report suggests completing an interval workout between 20 and 60 minutes in total – this includes recovery time and high intensity time.

INTENSITY: Next, choose the level of intensity, which can measured by one of two ways; the level of perceived exertion scale or by the maximum heart rate percentage.

You want to determine the level of intensity you want to work out at in advance, creating a goal to work towards without stopping or slowing down.

The scale measures the 1 to 10 level of perceived exertion that the exerciser experienced. Level one signifies the lowest level of exertion, such as a light walk. Level 10 signifies the highest level of exertion, such as an all-out sprint.

Exercisers should aim to exercise at specific levels and then quantify their exertion upon completion to ensure they are putting forth the appropriate effort.

The maximum heart rate percentage can be chosen once the resting heart rate and maximum heart rate levels have been determined.

Through a series of tests, often provided by a personal trainer, one can determine their maximum heart rate level.

The ACSM report suggests that when seeking to use maximum heart rate the exerciser aim to achieve be less than 80-percent of their maximum heart rate. The recovery heart rate should range between 40- and 50-percent of the maximum heart rate.

FREQUENCY: When creating an interval training plan the final step is to select the frequency of the interval workout.

The frequency can mean one of two things; the amount of intervals per session or the amount of interval workouts per week.

An exerciser can choose the amount of interval sessions they wish to complete or they can choose a set amount of time they will spend doing the intervals.

The amount of interval sessions and length of time of an interval should be determined based on an individual’s fitness level and goals.

If planning on completing more than one interval session per week sessions should be carefully planned.

The ACSM report suggests completing no more than two interval sessions per week, allowing at least 24 hours of rest between sessions.

Examples of indoor interval training

Cycling

Cycling indoors can be done on a stationary exercise bike or in a cycling class offered at a gym.

Both are effective and great forms of indoor cardiorespiratory training.

The January issue of Runner’s World Magazine suggests completing a fast interval for 10 seconds using a resistance that feels “…like you’re climbing a hill that if it were any steeper you would have to stand.”

The article, written by Runner’s World magazine writer Caitlin Carlson, suggests a rest between intervals for 30 to 80 seconds with six total interval sessions.

This is just one example of an interval. Intervals can be completed for anywhere between a few seconds to eight minutes, and should be broken up with set rest periods.

Swimming

Swimming is a very beneficial cross training workout for runners seeking to provide their body with a rest from the impact of running on land.

Swimming is a whole-body workout that serves as a wonderful form of cardiorespiratory activity.

An example of a swimming interval workout would be to swim as quickly as possible for one to two laps followed by four slow to medium paced laps.

Either repeat this set eight times or for a total of 20 to 30 minutes.

Water running

Water running provides runners the opportunity to actually run without creating any impact on their bodies.

Water running is often associated with geriatrics or injury. However, water running is quite common among elite athletes seeking to prevent injury and increase endurance.

An example of a workout would be to complete a sprint the full length of the pool and back while wearing a flotation belt to create resistance.

The sprints should be recovered with slow to medium jogging for two to four minutes.

Indoor track running

Running indoors can be tedious, however if the exercise does not run on a track this may be a great opportunity to incorporate speed into their training.

An example of an indoor track workout would be an increasing sprint workout. Begin by warming up with 2 to 4 laps around the track. Begin the workout by running at high speed for ¼ of the distance of the track. Recover by running around the track once at a slow to medium pace.

After the recovery continue by continually increasing the speed of the sprints until you run the entire length of the track.

For an added challenge complete the workout in reverse, continually decreasing the distance.

Cool down by running the track two to four times once the workout is completed.

These workouts are sure to fully prepare you for all of the wonderful local spring races coming up just around the corner!

Now it is your turn!

I would LOVE to hear from YOU. Pleas share your thoughts on this article. Was it helpful for you? Do you have any questions? Is there a topic you would like to learn more about?

I look forward to hearing from you 🙂

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessing,

Angela Joy xo

This is THE Year: You Will Accomplish Your Goal

You cann

It is a new year, which means a new you. A you who is not afraid of a challenge. This is the year. You are going to overcome your fears and accomplish your goals.

You ARE going to complete a half marathon!

The half marathon race has become one of the MOST popular events in the world – with hundreds of people completing the challenge every weekend.

According to Competitor.com, the half marathon has been the fastest growing race distance in the U.S. for the past 12 consecutive years.

“And it’s not showing signs of slowing down anytime soon,”Competitor.com writer Mario Fraioli stated. 

Fraiolo compares the half marathon to the third bowl of porridge referenced in Goldilocks, “It’s neither too short nor too long, it’s just right.”

The Half Marathon; What is it Exactly? 

  • The half marathon race is a total of 13.1 miles. It is half of the full marathon distance, which is 26.2.
  • Training for a half marathon should consist of about 3-4 runs per week, gradually increasing in mile distance throughout the training schedule.
  • Based on each individual’s needs and time commitments, a training schedule is made up of different run types, times and distances – with a long run on the weekend.
  • For those who want to improve their fitness and running abilities, cross training and resistance training can also be implemented.

Spring is the perfect time to run in a half marathon and there are a ton available!

If planning on running in a spring half marathon, February is the perfect month to start training.

If running is new to you, or you don’t know where to start I am offering a special
Half Marathon Training Package Deal this month
to help you kick-start the New Year
& accomplish your goals!

You cannn

Personalized Half Marathon Training Plan (Monthly)
-Customized training schedule-based on specific goals, athletic ability & schedule
-Running tips and advice
-All of your running questions answered via email
-Support and motivation along the way!
-Nutrition advice and assistance
-Race day tips
-Race day checklist
-And more!

All for $30 per month 

Personalized Half Marathon Training Plan (3-month) 
-3 month training schedule based on specific goals, athletic ability and schedule
-Training tips and advice
-Support and motivation
-List of race day tips

All for $30

To get started, or learn more, contact me at ajciroalo@gmail.com.
I would LOVE to help you get started and achieve this exceptional goal!

Believe in yourself, I believe in you. Let’s do this!

Contact me today!
angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

Let’s Train together
Trick or Trot_Oct 25 2015

 

The reason behind common running injuries

By: Angela Ciroalo

As a runner it is very common to develop aches, pains and even injuries.

These various aches and pains may be due to a number of causes such as; repeated overuse, improper shoes, overused shoes, improper form, running surface, and many others.

When an injury occurs it is best to confront the issue by examining the gait cycle of the runner.

A gait cycle begins when the foot lifts off the ground and ends when the same foot returns. Analyzing the gait cycle will reveal any issues that may be occurring between the foot and ankle during the landing and lift off of the foot.

The gait analysis is broken up into two phases; the stance phase and the swing phase.

The phase most commonly examined is the stance phase where pronation can be distinguished.

The stance phase includes the foot strike, the mid-stance of the foot, and the propulsion of the foot.

The type of gait that the runner displays may explain the reason behind the pain or injury the runner is experiencing.

The different types of gaits include neutral pronation, under pronation and over pronation.

Neutral pronation is normal and signifies that the runner’s foot is properly landing and lifting during each step of the gait cycle.

neutral

Neutral pronation occurs at a 15-percent inward rotation of the ankle.

The small degree of inward rotation is normal for the ankle and foot because it allows the foot to properly absorb the force of the foot strike and propulsion.

During neutral pronation the propulsion of the foot occurs amongst the two largest toes. Lift-off of the foot is best observed in this position due to the strength of these two toes.

Injuries are not associated with neutral pronation because neutral pronation is the optimal gait cycle of a runner.

Under pronation and over-pronation are associated with higher rates of injury due to the improper positioning of the foot and ankle during the gait cycle.

OVER PRONATION
Over pronation is the excessive pronation of the foot and ankle during the gait cycle.

During excessive pronation, the foot and ankle roll inward at an angle greater than 15-percent causing the arch of the foot to collapse upon landing.

Over pronation does not only affect the rotation of the foot and ankle, the inward rotation of the ankle further causes the lower leg, knee and hip to also internally rotate.

Due to the internal rotation of the entire leg limb, there is a much higher instance of experiencing running-related injuries.

Excessive pronation is most commonly recognized amongst runners who have little-to-no arch, or flat feet. However, it is also possible for over pronation to occur amongst those who have neutral and high arches.

Over pronation occurs due to lack of stability in the ankle and foot, which can occur regardless of arch type.

Common signs of over pronation include wear found on the lining of the inside of the shoe, wear found along the lining of the bottom of the shoe, in addition to the formation of foot calluses and foot bunions.

pronation defined

Each of the signs demonstrate the consistent force that internal portion of the foot has had with the shoe due to the excessive internal ankle rotation.

Common injuries associated with over pronation include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, patella-femoral syndrome, shin splints, tarsal tunnel syndrome, and anterior compartment syndrome.

Fortunately, over pronation can be confronted.

Over pronation occurs due to the lack of stability in the ankle and foot, therefore a stability running shoe can aid in preventing over pronation.

In a stability show a medial post is used to provide stable ankle movement during the running process.

Another option over-pronators can try is the use of orthotic inserts or arch supports. Both options will provide ankle support in runners that will aid in preventing excessive pronation.

To prevent pain or tightness attributed to over pronation it is suggested that runners stretch the plantar fascia muscle under the foot, the Achilles tendon, as well as the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles.

To prevent over pronation from occurring runners can also try performing strength building ankle and foot exercises to create a natural stability in the ankle and foot.

Pronation supination

UNDER PRONATION
Under pronation is in fact the opposite of over pronation. Under pronation is the lack of inward rotation.

Under pronation occurs when the foot does not effectively roll inward upon landing causing the outside edge of the foot to absorb the landing of the foot instead.

During under pronation the foot rotates at an angle less than the 15-percent of neutral ankle pronation, creating an almost external rotation at the ankle.

During this process the smaller toes are then forced to support the propulsion of the foot as it lifts from the ground, opposed to the larger toes which were created for this purpose.

Similar to over pronation, the angle of the ankle and foot is irregular therefore the foot and ankle are not properly inline during the gait cycle.

The irregularity in the foot and ankle will then in-turn create irregularity in the entire leg limb.

Due to the outward rotation in the ankle and foot, the lower leg, knee and hip are forced to turn outward, causing a different variety of running-related injuries.

Common signs of under pronation include wear found on the external lining on the bottom of the shoe, tight Achilles tendons, heavy-footed running and high arches.

foot soleArches

Common injuries associated with under pronation includes iliotibial band syndrome, shin splints, ankle sprains, lower back pain, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, hip and heel stress fractures, knee, hip or ankle pain, and metatarsal stress fractures.

Fortunately, under pronation can also be confronted.

Due to the lack of flexibility in the foot and ankle it is suggested that an under-pronator run in a neutral shoe that does not offer stability.

An under-pronator requires a shoe that offers flexibility and promotes movement in the ankle creating neutral pronation and proper foot landing and propulsion.

Under pronators can also use orthotic inserts and arch supports to stabilize proper movement of the ankle during the gait cycle.

To address tightness caused by under pronation stretch is another important component.

Lower leg muscles, such as the soleus, gastrocnemius, the plantar fascia under the foot,  and the Achilles tendon should all be stretched.

To prevent under pronation from occurring runners can also try performing strength building ankle and foot exercises to create a natural stability in the ankle and foot.

Keep running

YOUR MOTIVATION
Though injury can be a hassle, it is important for runners to never lose sight of their goals. Do not allow a small speed bump ruin the entire ride.

Injuries can be healed. Imbalances can be strengthened. Improper form can be straightened.

Never lose sight of your goal. Stay committed to healing the injury and focus on improving your overall strength and health – and you will run your best.

Find motivation to run this month from the words of author Joyce Carol Oates, “Running! If there’s any activity happier, more exhilarating, more nourishing to the imagination, I can’t think of what it might be. In running the mind flees with the body, the mysterious efflorescence of language seems to pulse in the brain, in rhythm with our feet and the swinging of our arms.”

This article was previously published in Night & Day Magazine. 

Now I would love to hear from you!

  • Has this article been helpful to you?
  • Have you experienced any recent running-related injuries?
  • Do you feel that over or under pronation has impacted you and your running ability?
  • What is you experience with pronation?
  • I look forward to hearing from you!

❤ Blessings, joy & love,

Angela Joy

Top 10 Tips for New Runners

By: Angela  Ciroalo

Learn to fall in love with running this autumn with these 10 easy-to-follow tips for runners just starting out.

  1. Learn to walk before you can run

There is no reason to begin your running journey by sprinting.

Running is all about pacing yourself. Learn this early on.

Begin your first run by walking with short bursts of jogging.

If you feel comfortable with this, jog at a very low speed.

As you begin to feel more comfortable running, begin to increase your speed or distance, depending on your goals.

Ease into your new routine. Allow your body to acclimate to this new activity.

Enjoy the sights and sounds around you while running. Try not to focus on the distance or time remaining. Take notice of all that you are able to see and experience along the way.

Run Walk
 Photo taken from Active.com 

  1. Warm up and cool down

Warming your body up before a run will improve performance and prevent injury.

Start your workouts with a simple warm up such as jumping jacks, a light jog, marching in place; whatever you feel most comfortable doing for five to ten minutes before a run.

Once you have finished your workout, take five to ten minutes to cool down at a slow pace.

A cool down will allow the body to readjust after your activity. All cool downs should also be followed by ten minutes of stretching. If you want to prevent injuries, stretch.

Your muscles will thank you.

Warm Up

Photo taken from newmarketsoccerclub.com.au

Runner stretches
Photo taken from pixgood.com

  1. Set a Goal

Whether your goal is weight loss, better overall health, finishing a race in a certain amount of time, or running a specific distance – it is important to select a goal.

When times are tough and you feel like giving up, your goal will remind you why you started.

It will also give you’re the extra push you need to try harder when you feel as though you have given your all.

  1. Perfect your Form

The form of a runner is critical in preventing injuries and improving performance.

Form is your body placement during a run.

New runners should get in the habit of running with optimal form early on.

To improve your form, take notice of your posture, head placement, torso movements, arm swings, foot strike and stride length during a run.

Is your back straight? Are your arms pumping to fast? Are you over striding your steps? Are you looking down instead of up?

runner form

  1. Create Accountability

Once your goal is set, share it with friends, family and social media.

The more people you tell about your goal, the more people that will hold you accountable for achieving it.

It feels great to share your progress along the way and feel the support of those around you.

Another great form of accountability is to recruit a running partner. Someone who will train with you and support you along the way.

Training partners are invaluable when just starting out.

  1. Rest and recover

The muscles need time to recover, especially when beginning a new routine.

Days off from exercise are very important in preventing an overuse injury.

If taking a full day off is very difficult for you, try cross training or yoga.

This way you are able to rest the muscles used during a run while still working out your body.

toga

  1. Strengthen your whole body

Running should not be your only activity.

Exercise should be balanced throughout the body.

If you plan on running three days out of the week, take one to two days to strength train.

Balance lower body workouts with upper body.

Cross training is another great way to create strength throughout the body, rather than just in your legs.

Try implementing Pilates, biking and/or swimming to recruit strength from the whole body.

lift

  1. Improve eating habits

Many new runners get confused about how much to eat, when to eat, and how often.

The amount you eat should depend on the way you feel.

Listen to your body. If you feel hungry, eat. If you feel full, don’t.

The real focus should be on implementing natural, whole food.

Begin including whole grains, vegetables, fruits and healthy fats into your diet, rather than just eating larger portions.

My Plate

Composition of various exotic fruits isolated on white background

  1. Choose a training plan

Once you have chosen your goal, select a realistic training plan that you allow you to achieve it without getting side tracked.

Select the date or month that you would like your goal achieved by.

Mark down the amount of weeks you have to get there.

And choose the distances and speeds that you will complete each week until then.

Make sure your training plan is realistic and accommodating to your fitness level and available training time.

5k plan
Photo taken from www.makingthymeforhealth.com

  1. Get the appropriate gear

Many people will lace up their old sneakers and throw on an old t-shirt for their first run.

While this is great when just getting started, if you plan to continue running it is best to pick up a supportive pair of running shoes and some comfortable running gear.

Comfortable shirts and shorts that do not stick to your body or cause chafing make all the difference. They also improve confidence.

When picking up a dri-fit running shirt, be sure to stop in the shoe section.

According to the September 2015 issue of Runners’ World magazine our feet absorb two to four times our body weight with each step we take.

The more supportive your shoes are, the more impact your shoes absorb, rather than your ankles, knees and hips.

Stop by a local running store and have your shoes fitted.

Author Sarah Condor once said, “Remember, the feeling you get from a good run is far better than the feeling you get from sitting around wishing you were running.”

So stop thinking about running, get out there and start doing it.

Start with a jog around your block, a jog to the park, or even a walk down the street.

Your first step is the most important.

PierHouse 5k Race Pier House 5k

(Above, myself with friends during a recent 5k race.)
I had a wonderful time!
Running alongside other people was really encouraging. I ran much faster than I expected. I was hoping to finish in 25 minutes, running eight minute miles. Surprisingly, I was able to finish in 22:31, running an average of 7:15 minute miles.

If you are interested in running, I strongly urge you to participate in a 5k race.
Races are A LOT of fun. They leave you with such a running high that you cannot wait to get out there and run some more.

If there is any topic that you feel was not covered in the, “Top 10 Tips for New Runners” article, please notify me and I would be happy to include the information.

Wishing you love, joy and blessings!
Get outside and RUN today. 

Best,

Angela Joy

How Cross-Training Can Improve Runner Performance

By: Angela Ciroalo

In this article I will share my experience with over-training and how it led me to recognize the importance of cross training for runners and athletes alike.

2015-08-02_14.04.11

How Over-Training Led Me to Love Cross-Training

 

In the beginning of the summer I, like many other runners, selected my next big race. I chose a fall marathon to motivate me to train throughout the summer.

I excitedly marked the date of the race down on my calendar and counted the amount of weeks I had to train. I studied the course. I read the race reviews. I even purchased new shoes and shoe-inserts to ensure injury prevention.

Since my last marathon in November I continued a frequent running schedule. I ran one high mileage run, one speed workout, and one interval workout, per week.  I felt great and fully prepared to begin training for my next marathon, or so I thought.

I was nearly finished with my first week of training when I ran into an unexpected road block. I turned the corner to finish the last straight-away of my final run for the week when pain shot down my iliotibial band muscle and down into my knee. I ran a few more steps and the pain did not dismiss, therefore I decided it was best for me to walk.

I felt defeated. I wondered what I did wrong and whether or not this would prevent me from competing in my next marathon.

Without jumping to conclusion, I decided to take it easy for the next few days. The following day I attended a Pilates class.

The day after, I ran on an elliptical.

The third day I went for a bike ride.

By day four I noticed I was sore from the different types of exercises that I had been doing. The soreness led me to a realization; I had been so focused on running to prepare for the next race that I was completely ignoring the muscles in the rest of my body.

My main focus was the amount of miles I ran per week and the time that I was able to complete each run in.

The aches and pains I felt were all overlooked. The monotony of my workouts was overlooked. And, most importantly, the stress my body was feeling from only running – was overlooked.

I, like many runners, was caught up with the ambition to run farther and faster. I had become so engulfed with perfecting my running that the other areas of my bodies were dismissed, leading to an overuse injury.

Why Cross Train?

According to marathon runner and author Matthew Fitzgerald cross training for runners can aid in preventing injuries, create quicker rehabilitation time, create greater aerobic fitness, increases the runner’s power, and improve the runner’s efficiency.

Some runners believe that there is no replacement for running. This approach may work for some, however I found in my experience that it did not work for me.

I experienced a very common overuse injury which I am working to rehabilitate and strengthen through cycling, shorter runs, Cybex® Arc training, strength training and Pilates exercises.

None of these exercises were included in my previous training plan. Since incorporating these exercises I feel stronger, faster, and as if my overall fitness level has improved dramatically.

In addition to incorporating these change in my training schedule I decided to run a half marathon instead of a full marathon this fall.

The cross training activities that I will have been working on are only a few of the many exercises available.

Types of Cross Training

Cross Training

Photo taken from completetrackandfield.com

The website Marathontraining.com lists several types of cross training that specifically benefit runners.

Cross training exercises recommended for runners by marathontraining.com include; cycling, swimming, the Elliptical trainer, Cybex® Arc trainer, deep water running, an Ergometer (rowing) machine, Nordic Track Ski-Simulator machine, Stair-Master, Versa-Climber, walking and strength training.

The American Running Association [ARA] references studies that proved the benefit of cycling, weight training and walking for runners.

The ARA found in a study completed by the University of Utah that interval cycling workouts increase speed without the impact of running sprints.

The ARA found in a study completed by Ron Johnston at the University of New Hampshire in Durham that resistance weight training in the upper and lower parts of the body increased runner’s speed in a 10 kilometer run.

The ARA stated that walking is another beneficial activity for runners. The ARA referenced the Jeff Galloway Marathon Training Program, which educates runners on the benefits of walking and running slowly, and found that walking can improve runner’s endurance.

Another area of cross-training to consider is taking exercise classes. Activities such as Pilates, yoga, Zumba, cardio exercise classes and aqua classes, will each offer different benefits to runners.

Each of the cross training activities listed are beneficial to runner’s seeking to avoid injury and improve fitness level.

We are all different; the cross training exercise that works best for you may not work for me.  Try giving each of the different types a try, allowing yourself to explore what works best for you and your body.

Inspiration ❤ 

This month’s inspirational running quote to get you started towards better health comes from runner, author and columnist John Hanc,”At least 99-percent of running is just showing up, getting out there and putting one foot in front of the other.”

This article was adapted from an article published in Night & Day Magazine

Running motivation

Capable of so much more

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings,

Angela Joy

Runner’s Tips for Avoiding Heat Illness This Summer

By: Angela Ciroalo

Things are heating up at the Jersey Shore – quite literally actually.
Summer has finally set in and runners alike are enjoying every bit of it.

Despite the welcoming temperatures and sun’s refreshing beams, there are some factors that must be considered before jumping onto the pavement to run these next two months.

Jumping on the beach

Photo taken from http://www.philly.com

Heat Illness
Heat illness can occur to anyone participating in outdoor activity during a hot day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] reported that between 1999 and 2010 an average of 618 people died in the United States each year due to a health-related illness.

The CDC further stated that heat-related deaths are more common in the United States than deaths due to tornadoes, earthquakes, floods and hurricanes combined.

HOT running
Photo taken from philly.com

The cause of a heat illness is often attributed to the body being unable to regulate the internal temperature controls, medicinenet.com reported in a June 2015 article titled, Hypothermia.

During high temperatures, the body will attempt to cool itself down through the evaporation of sweat.

Issues occur, however, when conditions such as high temperatures and humidity levels prevent sweat from evaporating, leaving the body in an overheated state.

Sweat is unable to evaporate as quickly in high heat/humid conditions, preventing heat from being released.

Types of Heat Illnesses
There are several types of heat-related illnesses.

Heat-related illnesses include; heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hypernatremia, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].

Heat Illness
Photo taken from kidshealth.org

Heat cramps are pains most commonly in the quadriceps, hamstrings and calves, caused by dehydration, electrolyte loss or inadequate blood flow to muscles.

Heat syncope is the result of decreased blood flow to the brain.

Heat exhaustion is a shock-like condition caused due to the body’s inability to acclimate to the high temperature and level of exercise, combined.

Hyponatremia, or water intoxication, is the attributed to excess water intake without proper electrolyte consumption.

Common symptoms and signs of heat-related illness includes; profuse sweating, dizziness, faintness, increased heart rate, nausea, vomiting, headache, extreme thirst, chills,  and even loss of consciousness.

Heat Illnesses
P
hoto taken from uchicago.edu

The most severe of the heat-related illnesses is heat stroke.

Heat stroke occurs when the body temperature is too high and the thermal regulatory mechanism is overwhelmed, according to the HSCC.

Heat stroke can occur due to fluid depletion or inability to absorb fluid.

Key signs include hot skin, pale skin, high pulse, high respiratory rate, decreased urine output, a temperature over 104 or 105 decreased Fahrenheit and pupils that are dilated or unresponsive.

Treating Heat Illness
Most of the above stated heat illnesses can be treated by moving the ill person to a cool, shaded area, placing a wet towel on their skin, elevating the feet, and offering them water and/or an electrolyte-filled beverage.

In the event of a more severe heat illness, call emergency personnel immediately.

Heat ill
Photo taken from constantcontact.com

Tips to Avoid Heat Illness
There are a number of ways to avoid heat-related illness during exercise this summer.

The first and foremost action should be, however, to check the heat index.

The heat index is the air temperature and humidity levels – combined, to provide a description of how the temperature will feel, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].
The heat index will determine whether or not it is safe to participate in outdoor activity.

Heat Index
Photo taken from wsu.edu

When temperatures exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit, runners should not partake in outdoor exercise.

To avoid the steaming temperatures of the hot summer days runners can exercise in the early morning or late night hours.

If temperatures are hot, but not hot enough to refrain from participating in exercise, runners should hydrate well throughout the day and during their run, wear lightweight clothing, and exercise for a shorter and slower distance than they regularly do.

Safety precautions should always be taken during hot temperatures in an effort to avoid injury and illness.

Avoid Heat Injury
Photo taken from twu.edu

Angela’s Summer Running Plan
This summer I will be training for the Atlantic City Marathon, which means I will be outside running – a lot.

ACMarathon
Photo taken from teamintraining.org

In an effort to avoid risk of injury I will be running after sunset and hydrating with additional electrolytes and water throughout each day.

During shorter distance runs I often do not take a water bottle or Camelback water pack with me, although due to the higher temperatures I will.

Taking precaution during exercise is important – not only to avoid injury – but also to improve performance.

The heat can have a severe impact on a runner’s performance, which creates a greater reason to take precaution during these beautiful, hot summer months.

A great quote to get you running this month is from marathon record breaker Bill Rodgers, “Anyone can be a runner. We were meant to move. We were meant to run. It is the easiest sport.”

This article was previously published in Night & Day Magazine

If you have been running outside, share with me some of your warm weather outdoor running tips/suggestions. I would love to hear from you!

Check back in soon to hear more about my training schedule and plans!

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings.
Best,

Angela Joy

Become a Faster, Stronger, Healthier Runner with Optimal Form

By: Angela Ciroalo

As a runner living along the Jersey Shore I commonly pass other runners by the beach or throughout local trails.

Some are running slow, others running fast – one thing that I can’t help but notice is the many differences in each runner’s form.

A runner’s form is the position of their spine, head, arms, legs and feet while running.

Form is an important component of running that I do not think receives enough attention.

When first learning to run people often focus on the length of time they are able to complete a run or how fast they were, meanwhile the movement of their body is often overlooked.

Form is important because the position of the body can greatly impact a runner’s performance, their instance of injury, and even their level of enjoyment.

As a new runner, I too never gave my form much thought. I did not see the significance and

However, as time continued, and my knee pain increased, I realized the importance of proper running form.

Correct Running Form
Photo taken from travellingscorner.com

Running Form Mistakes
The 10 most common running mistakes, according Iloverunningmagazine.com, include; looking down; keeping the shoulders and body tense; clenching the fists; rotating the torso; placing the arms in the “chicken wing” position; leaning the torso too far forward; over-striding; heel-striking; over bending the knees; and breathing shallow.

Bad Running FOrm
P
hoto taken from zero-drop.com

Most runners will make one or more of these mistakes every day.

Now that you are aware of these common mistakes let’s take a look at how to fix them – and help you achieve peak running performance.

The Runner’s Head
We will address the placement of your entire body, since running is a sport that includes the entire body, but first we will begin with the head.

Proper running form includes an upright head looking forward.
When a runner is looking down, their neck and back muscles become strained trying to support their 7 to 10 pound head.

Over time, the strain can turn into an injury, ultimately damaging muscles and causing unnecessary pain.

In an article published on WorldRunning.com, an international running site powered by the International Association of Athletics Federation, it was suggested that runners keep their head in a straight and neutral position, allowing the head to align with the shoulders and back.

Maintaining a straight and upright head will improve posture, performance and experience.
It will also allow you to notice the beautiful scenery around you, the other smiling runners – and prevent you from running into any poles or cars.

The Runner’s Shoulders
Runners often arch their back and raise their shoulders, as if they were typing at a computer.

Running in proper form includes rolling the shoulders back and keeping them square with the chest.

Another good tip to keep in mind is to allow the shoulders to remain loose and free from tension.

The Runner’s Spine
The spine can move in many different directions depending on the placement of the runner’s body.

Runners can achieve optimal performance when running with a straight, upright spine.

A common term used to explain optimal posture is to “run tall” or to run with a string pulling the head and body up straight.

Placement of the Arms and Hands
While running the arms are used to balance the body while the feet lift off the ground.

Optimal balance and running performance is created when the arms move at the same pace as the feet, the arms are moving towards the shoulders and back down towards the hips, and the hands are loose.

A few things to avoid include running with arms across the body, keeping the hands close to the shoulders, and clenching the fists.

Running should be a smooth and relaxed, symmetrical movement throughout the entire body.

The Runner’s Stride
In an article published on WorldRunning.com, it stated that optimal running performance is achieved when a runner’s strides are short and the knees have a slight bend and lift.

Making shorter strides, no further than your knee, will cause your feet to land under the body, opposed over-striding the leg away from the body.

Forefront
P
hoto taken from altitude-blog.com

The Runner’s Foot Placement
In recent years, much debate has been expressed between the differences in landing on the heel or the forefront of the foot.

WorldRunning.com stated that landing on the forefoot area of the foot is “the most efficient way of running” to prevent injury and achieve peak performance.

Due to the suggested benefits I decided to give it a try.

What I found was that my knee pain disappeared, my form straightened and my performance improved.

Physical therapist Jay Dicharry from the University of Virginia’s Center for Endurance Sport stated in a Runners World Magazine article that when the foot lands on the forefront, the ankle and foot will absorb the force of the landing and create a spring in each lift off.

When the heel lands, however, the landing is a “stiff system” which does not allow the ankle to “give,” Mr. Dicharry said.

Therefore, when the heel hits the ground the shock will be shifted to the knee.

This is not to say that the heel strike is wrong. Some runners prefer it and have not had any issues as a result of landing on their heels.

Running Tips
P
hoto taken from thrillon.com

The Benefits of Proper Running Form
Each of these tips do not have to be incorporated all at once. If there is one that you prefer to the other, try that first and make changes gradually.

Transforming the way you run can make lasting changes in your performance, posture, health as well as your love for the sport.

“Believe that you can run farther or faster. Believe that you’re young enough, old enough, strong enough, and so on to accomplish everything you want to do. Don’t let worn-out beliefs stop you from moving beyond yourself,” running champion and author John Bigham once said.

This article was previously published in Night and Day Magazine

Angela Ciroalo_Running Form_2015

Best,

Angela Joy

Resources for improving running form:
Runner’s World: http://bit.ly/1e62ybx
http://bit.ly/1j2yCtR
I Love Running Magainze: http://bit.ly/1Mt2ehQ
YMCA: http://bit.ly/1FM3J6P
World Running: http://bit.ly/1jr5PTD
The Run Doctor: http://bit.ly/1B98Ukl
Good Running Form: http://www.goodformrunning.com/
Chi Running: http://bit.ly/1pFfEk2
Competitor.com: http://bit.ly/1nLoYOD

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