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Stay Cool on Your Next Run with These Great Tips!

By: Angela Joy

All year long we count down the days till the sun is shining, the ocean water is glistening and the warm sand sits beneath our toes – alas summer has arrived!

When you live along the Shore, you can’t help but love summer. When you are a runner this love has a completely new meaning.
Warm weather means more daylight which equates to more running – and who doesn’t love more running?

While the warm weather and increased daylight can be fantastic the summer season does have the potential to create some critical situations such as; heat exhaustion, heat stroke, severe dehydration, sun burn, and severe body fatigue.

In an effort to stay cool and healthy this summer while running, try following the following tips.

Running water

  1. Stay Properly Hydrated

Hydration is critical when running during the summer months.
Dehydration can lead to difficulty breathing which can lead to injury, falling faint, or even heat stroke.

When the body is lacking hydration the amount of blood volume decreases causing the heart to pump harder which will impact performance.

As a result it is best to drink water before a run, during a run and after the run.

Be conscious of your hydration level.

Try checking the color of your urine to determine how hydrated your body is.

The darker the color the lower the level of hydration.

The lighter the color the greater the level of hydration.

  1. Warm Up and Warm Down

Before you begin your workout or next race be sure to start with a warm up.

I know this may sound counterproductive especially if temperature is warm and your body already feels warm, however the warm up is a very important part of running.

The warm up allows the body to adapt to the movement that you are preparing for.
Blood is pooled into the legs and arms away from the organs in order to allow you to run.

The warm up also allows the body time to acclimate to the current temperature.

If you spent the morning indoors with the air conditioning on your body will not be prepared to jump outside in the heat and start running.

The warm down, or cool down, is also important.

If it is very hot outside and you have just completed a workout you it is important to slow down your pace for another mile or so, allowing the body to cool down, the heart rate to decrease and

Long Distance

  1. Wear Sun Screen

While running outdoors during the summertime it is important to apply sunscreen to skin surface areas that will be exposed on the run.

Sun burns and skin cancers are not fun, therefore preventative measures such as applying sunscreen early and consistently are essential.

In an article published in Running Times in May 2015 San Diego runner and board certified dermatologist Jeffrey Benabio stated that the best sunscreen to apply is the on “you’ve got.”

Benabio suggests applying sunscreen with an SPF of 30 while consistently re-applying.

When applying sunscreen make sure to cover all of your bases; face, lips, head, ears, chest, arms and legs.

  1. Wear the Proper Attire

While I can suggest to you specific clothes to wear in the heat it is equally important to recognize clothes not to wear in the heat.

Clothes that are black, made of cotton, are too big, and stick to the body should not be worn when running in the heat.

Items that should be worn include dri-fit and sunlight reflective clothing, sleeves to block the sun, a hat or visor and sunglasses.

Each item will assist in keeping your skin health, sunburn free and the body cool.

ST Runners

  1. Run at the Right Time of Day

In an effort to avoid the high temperatures or high humidity try running early in morning before sunrise or late at night just before sunset, or even after if possible.

Avoid running in the middle of the day when the temperatures are at their high and the sun is strongest.

Both running early and late in the day may seem inconvenient, however both can be very relaxing and enjoyable.

Very few people are awake or out on the road at these times plus you might get a chance to see a sunset or sunrise.

  1. Run in Shaded Areas

Try running in a new location.

Seek out areas close by a body of water, surrounded by trees or in a cool area.

Running on asphalt, in the middle of the day, without any trees or a breeze can be disastrous.

No matter how well you have prepared for the run you will feel drained and can potentially harm the body.

Seek out shaded areas and enjoy the run without the discomfort.

Running 2

  1. Listen to your Body!

Most importantly listen to your body.

Running is the heat can have a dramatically negative impact on the body.

If the proper precautions are not taken you may find yourself feeling nauseous, sluggish, tired, ill and/or dizzy.

Listen to your body. If it feels too hot to run – don’t.

If you feel tired and think you should stop, don’t test yourself – not on a hot day.

Recognize and feeling of concern and address it as soon as possible.

When dealing with heat, err on the side of caution.

Enjoy the sun and the surf this summer. Stay cool and keep running!

 

Do you like to run in the summer? Share with me some of your favorite summer running tips! I would love to hear from you. 

 

❤ Wishing you joy, blessings and love,

Angela Joy

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Runner’s Tips for Avoiding Heat Illness This Summer

By: Angela Ciroalo

Things are heating up at the Jersey Shore – quite literally actually.
Summer has finally set in and runners alike are enjoying every bit of it.

Despite the welcoming temperatures and sun’s refreshing beams, there are some factors that must be considered before jumping onto the pavement to run these next two months.

Jumping on the beach

Photo taken from http://www.philly.com

Heat Illness
Heat illness can occur to anyone participating in outdoor activity during a hot day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] reported that between 1999 and 2010 an average of 618 people died in the United States each year due to a health-related illness.

The CDC further stated that heat-related deaths are more common in the United States than deaths due to tornadoes, earthquakes, floods and hurricanes combined.

HOT running
Photo taken from philly.com

The cause of a heat illness is often attributed to the body being unable to regulate the internal temperature controls, medicinenet.com reported in a June 2015 article titled, Hypothermia.

During high temperatures, the body will attempt to cool itself down through the evaporation of sweat.

Issues occur, however, when conditions such as high temperatures and humidity levels prevent sweat from evaporating, leaving the body in an overheated state.

Sweat is unable to evaporate as quickly in high heat/humid conditions, preventing heat from being released.

Types of Heat Illnesses
There are several types of heat-related illnesses.

Heat-related illnesses include; heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hypernatremia, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].

Heat Illness
Photo taken from kidshealth.org

Heat cramps are pains most commonly in the quadriceps, hamstrings and calves, caused by dehydration, electrolyte loss or inadequate blood flow to muscles.

Heat syncope is the result of decreased blood flow to the brain.

Heat exhaustion is a shock-like condition caused due to the body’s inability to acclimate to the high temperature and level of exercise, combined.

Hyponatremia, or water intoxication, is the attributed to excess water intake without proper electrolyte consumption.

Common symptoms and signs of heat-related illness includes; profuse sweating, dizziness, faintness, increased heart rate, nausea, vomiting, headache, extreme thirst, chills,  and even loss of consciousness.

Heat Illnesses
P
hoto taken from uchicago.edu

The most severe of the heat-related illnesses is heat stroke.

Heat stroke occurs when the body temperature is too high and the thermal regulatory mechanism is overwhelmed, according to the HSCC.

Heat stroke can occur due to fluid depletion or inability to absorb fluid.

Key signs include hot skin, pale skin, high pulse, high respiratory rate, decreased urine output, a temperature over 104 or 105 decreased Fahrenheit and pupils that are dilated or unresponsive.

Treating Heat Illness
Most of the above stated heat illnesses can be treated by moving the ill person to a cool, shaded area, placing a wet towel on their skin, elevating the feet, and offering them water and/or an electrolyte-filled beverage.

In the event of a more severe heat illness, call emergency personnel immediately.

Heat ill
Photo taken from constantcontact.com

Tips to Avoid Heat Illness
There are a number of ways to avoid heat-related illness during exercise this summer.

The first and foremost action should be, however, to check the heat index.

The heat index is the air temperature and humidity levels – combined, to provide a description of how the temperature will feel, according to the United States Health Service Commission Corporation [HSCC].
The heat index will determine whether or not it is safe to participate in outdoor activity.

Heat Index
Photo taken from wsu.edu

When temperatures exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit, runners should not partake in outdoor exercise.

To avoid the steaming temperatures of the hot summer days runners can exercise in the early morning or late night hours.

If temperatures are hot, but not hot enough to refrain from participating in exercise, runners should hydrate well throughout the day and during their run, wear lightweight clothing, and exercise for a shorter and slower distance than they regularly do.

Safety precautions should always be taken during hot temperatures in an effort to avoid injury and illness.

Avoid Heat Injury
Photo taken from twu.edu

Angela’s Summer Running Plan
This summer I will be training for the Atlantic City Marathon, which means I will be outside running – a lot.

ACMarathon
Photo taken from teamintraining.org

In an effort to avoid risk of injury I will be running after sunset and hydrating with additional electrolytes and water throughout each day.

During shorter distance runs I often do not take a water bottle or Camelback water pack with me, although due to the higher temperatures I will.

Taking precaution during exercise is important – not only to avoid injury – but also to improve performance.

The heat can have a severe impact on a runner’s performance, which creates a greater reason to take precaution during these beautiful, hot summer months.

A great quote to get you running this month is from marathon record breaker Bill Rodgers, “Anyone can be a runner. We were meant to move. We were meant to run. It is the easiest sport.”

This article was previously published in Night & Day Magazine

If you have been running outside, share with me some of your warm weather outdoor running tips/suggestions. I would love to hear from you!

Check back in soon to hear more about my training schedule and plans!

❤ Wishing you love, joy and blessings.
Best,

Angela Joy

Tips on proper hydration and electrolyte consumption

By: Angela Joy

As summer sets in, many are preparing to take their exercise routines outdoors. However, before you head outside for your next run, bike ride or even basketball game, make sure you are properly hydrated.

The heat of the outdoor sun combined with the movement of our body causes our skin to perspire water and minerals. We sweat out water and minerals to cool the body down, preventing heat exhaustion.

To properly restore the water and minerals lost through our skin, you can follow these helpful tips that will include; the adequate amount of water to drink; the electrolytes needed for proper body functioning; as well as natural, organic electrolyte sources.

What are electrolytes? 

The minerals we lose through sweat commonly known as electrolytes.

According to the online healthcare publishing company Medical News Today [MNT], electrolytes are defined as any substance that contains free ions that behave as an electrically conductive medium.

Electrolytes are made up of minerals including sodium, potassium, calcium, bicarbonate, magnesium, chloride, hydrogen phosphate and hydrogen carbonate.

According to the Medical News Today article titled, “What are electrolytes,” humans cannot function without proper electrolyte levels.

“Electrolytes regulate our nerve and muscle function, our body’s hydration, blood pH, blood pressure and the rebuilding of damaged tissue,” Medical News Today stated in the 2014 article.

Not properly restoring electrolyte levels in the body during or after exercise can lead to dehydration, fatigue, muscle cramping and more.

In an effort to prevent dehydration amongst athletes and exercise enthusiasts, the American College of Sports Medicine [ACSM] created proper hydration standards.

The ACSM suggests that those exercising outdoors, or for long periods of time, replenish the amount of fluid lost, as well as the electrolytes lost, during exercise.

According to ACSM, the amount of fluids and electrolytes each person should consume will depend upon the individual, the amount of sweat perspired, and the length or exertion level of their exercise.

Water

Photo taken from girlsgotsole.com

Tips for avoiding dehydration

To avoid dehydration, the ACSM suggests that those participating in exercise drink 16 to 20 fluid ounces of water, or a sports beverage, at least four hours before exercise with and additional 8 to 12 fluid ounces of water consumed 10 to 15 minutes before exercise.

During exercise, the ACSM suggests that exercisers drink three to eight fluid ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes when exercising less than 60 minutes.

Running water

Photo taken from getactivetampa.com

If exercise is longer than 60 minutes, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise consume three to eight fluid ounces of a sport beverage, made up of carbohydrates and electrolytes, every 15 to 20 minutes.

The ACSM warns that those exercising do not drink more than one quart of liquids per hour, to avoid over-hydrating.

Once exercise is completed, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise estimate their fluid losses, then restore the full amount lost within two hours of exercise.

According to the ACSM, if you were to feel very thin after a bout of exercise, this is the result of fluid loss and not weight loss — therefore the steps to properly restore the body’s fluids should be taken as soon as possible.

Tips for properly restoring electrolytes 

Proper hydrating fluids generally include a carbohydrate [glucose] that also offers electrolyte minerals.

The ACSM stated that a liquid that includes a carbohydrate, or sugar, will replenish the lost glycogen in the muscles — preventing cramps and assisting with muscle recovery.

The ACSM suggests that during exercise the beverage consumed should contain carbohydrates, sodium and potassium.

Natural electrolyte options

Proper hydration restoration can be found in some standard sports drinks, however, in an effort to avoid white granulated sugar and unknown ingredients I chose whole, organic foods and drinks.

As I prepare for a long run, I pack my water bottle with diluted organic coconut water [two parts water, one part coconut water].

Other electrolyte-filled natural options include lemon water with honey and a touch of salt, orange-infused water or electrolyte-filled snacks.

My favorite go-to electrolyte-packed foods to eat during a run include: bananas, raisins and oranges.

Electrolyte 2

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy

Each of these foods contain electrolytes and carbohydrate to allow your body to properly restore the lost water and minerals levels – while also providing needed energy to sustain you.

Most fruits and vegetables contain electrolytes and are filled with water, allowing most raw fruit and vegetables to also serve as a great electrolyte-packed choice.

Group of different fruit and vegetables

Photo taken from enjoyagreatlife.com

Aside from natural foods, there are also many items available to purchase that offer electrolytes. Options include salt tablets, electrolyte-filled chews and gu, as well as electrolyte tablets and powders.

Vega

Photo taken from shopmyvega.com

(If I were to purchase a electrolyte item instead of eating it through food, I would purchase it from the Vega company)

I personally favor natural foods during my runs. However, if a supplement or tablet is more appealing to you, give it a try!

Since incorporating coconut water into my workout routines I have felt much more energy, I have been able to recover more quickly and I have completely avoided brain fog towards the end of my runs.

Coconut water

Photo taken from makecoffee.com

I inspire you to be stronger than your excuses – start exercising for at least a few minutes each day, gradually increase your rate each week, and never give up on yourself.

“Run when you can, walk if you have to, crawl if you must; just never give up,” Ultramarathon champion Dean Karrnazes said.

Remember, hydration is incredibly important — even if you are not an exercise enthusiast. We all should be conscious of our water consumption and never wait till we are thirsty to start drinking water.

Coconut Water Tip: When choosing the type of coconut water that you are going to consume, follow the Food Babe’s advice on the healthiest, purest options –>http://bit.ly/1l3r61i

Best,

Angela Joy

Originally published in Night & Day Magazine

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