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One-Week Whole Foods Cleanse: Meal Plan

One-Week Whole Foods Cleanse

Morning Routine:

  • Sleep 8 hours per night
  • Upon waking up drink 1 full glass of water
  • Once you have finished the water drink 1 cup of hot water with lemon

The Morning Power Hour:

  • Drink water – 5 min.
  • Stretch/exercise – 20 min. each morning
  • Write and recognize what you are grateful for today – 10 min.
  • Pray/Meditate/Sit in silence and think – 10 min.
  • Write down your thoughts, feelings, plans for the day – 5 min.
  • Write down your goals – 5 min.
  • Read – 5 min.

Mindset:

“I am grateful for my body and my life.”

One-Week Whole Cleanse Meal Plan: 

 

 

Breakfast:

  • Detoxifying, Delicious Green Smoothie
  • 1 cucumber, seeded and sliced (peel the skin off and scoop out the seeds)
  • 2 cups of raw spinach
  • 1 cups honeydew melon (or 1banana, 1 cup of strawberry, 1apple)
  • 1 cup organic green tea
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • ½ inch fresh ginger root

Lunch:

Snack Options:

  • Mixed vegetables dipped in hummus
  • Detoxing tea
  • Fruit dipped in non-dairy yogurt
  • Detoxifying smoothie

Dinner:

Dessert:

  • Freshly sliced fruit
  • One cup of giner tea

 

Juices

Day #2

 

Breakfast: Chocolate Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1fW56ZM

Lunch: Chickpea “Tuna” Salad — http://bit.ly/1MYAKnP

Snack: Healing, Cleansing Smoothie — http://bit.ly/21FhFMb

Handful of raw nuts

Dinner: Roasted Beets, Carrots, and Jerusalem Artichokes with Lemon and The Greenest Tahini Sauce– http://bit.ly/1zIm4PL

Dessert: Mystical Smoothie (you can sub out any of the fruits with ones that you have) à http://bit.ly/1KsSOqC

Fruit

Day #3

Breakfast: Chia Seed Pudding (prepare in advance) — http://bit.ly/1MpLM4i

Lunch: Superfood Crunch Salad — http://bit.ly/1BACNFD

Snack:  Spinach Love Wraps —  http://bit.ly/1TJmRvP

(I eat these often for lunch! )

Dinner: Next Level Enchiladas — http://bit.ly/1Sv2p36

Dessert: Green Monster Delicious Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1fPbmxe

 

Day #4

 

Breakfast: Happy Digestion Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1AmUa0F

Lunch: Winter Salad Bowl — http://bit.ly/1wqhDWy

Snack: Super Detox Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1uNxoYl

Dinner: Squash Bake — http://bit.ly/1IHeTkh

Dessert: Coconut Papaya Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1L3XNhH

Wraps

 

 

Day #5

Breakfast: Kale, Apple and Ginger juice — http://bit.ly/21FhFMb (Introducing juicing!)

Lunch: Pecan Arugula Salad — http://bit.ly/1Y59rcH

Snack: Berry Blast Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1QnoKw2

Dinner: Mediterranean Lentil Dip — http://bit.ly/1QO4VLj

Dessert: Coconut Yogurt — http://bit.ly/1dmFmpa

Oatmeal

 

Day #6

Breakfast: Overnight Oats (prepare in advance) — http://bit.ly/1MMYBDT

Lunch: Roasted Kale Hash — http://bit.ly/1NPxPd1 and/or Spicy Fruit Salad — http://bit.ly/1TSBcYe

Snack: Energy Boosting Smoothie — http://http://bit.ly/1psaUaW

Dinner: Burrito Bowl — http://bit.ly/1HGuBGn   (Delicious!!)

Dessert: Two Ingredient Truffles — http://bit.ly/1MD0MaV  (So easy and awesome!)

 

Delicious

Day #7

Breakfast: Dr. Oz’s Green Drink — http://bit.ly/1vZWynl

Lunch: Vegetable Soup (make in advance) — http://bit.ly/1FdOBBe

Snack: Super Energy Smoothie — http://bit.ly/1GGWKk8

Dinner: Spicy Buffalo Chickpea Wraps — http://bit.ly/20kRFmY

Dessert: Chocolate Bark — http://bit.ly/1NJZvA3

For more delicious cleansing recipes, click here:
http://bit.ly/177Y9kx
or
http://bit.ly/19MM1TU 

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One-Week Whole Foods Cleanse: Meal Planning

Blog Post # 5: Meal Planning – What to Eat

This post is part of a series of blog post articles that will/are being posted throughout the week in preparation of the cleanse which will occur next week. You are welcome to join and/or follow along! Please notify me if you are interested in joining. I will be happy to offer assistance and guidance along the way! 
Contact: angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

Listed below I have created several options for daily meals plans that can be followed during the one-week of whole foods cleanse!

You can mix and match, or you can follow consistently.

Additionally, listed at the bottom are resources for additional whole foods recipes.

whole foodss

Meal Plan Examples:

Meal Plan – Provided by PCRM

Breakfast
3 oatmeal pancakes with applesauce topping, calcium-fortified orange juice, fresh fruitLunch
Black bean burritos

Dinner
Chinese stir-fry over brown rice: tofu chunks, broccoli, pea pods, water chestnuts, and Chinese cabbage (bok choy), cantaloupe chunks drizzled with fresh lime juice

Snack
Dried figs

Breakfast
1 cup oatmeal with cinnamon and raisins, 1/2 cup fortified soymilk, 1 slice toast with 1 tablespoon almond butter, 1/2 grapefruitLunch
Whole wheat pita stuffed with hummus, sliced tomatoes, and lettuce, carrot sticks

Dinner
1 cup baked beans, baked sweet potato, 1 cup steamed collard greens drizzled with lemon juice, baked apple

Snack
Banana soymilk shake

Meal Plan – Provided by Whole Foods

(Note: some recipes contain animal products) 

Breakfast

Lunch

Sunday

Hot Cereal; Fresh Fruit Roasted Veggie & Hummus Wraps; 100% Fruit Popsicles Carrot Cashew Spreadon Woven Wheats; Lentil Chili; Green Salad

Monday

Apple-Cinnamon Oat Squares; Fresh Fruit Lentil Chili; Salad with Peanut Orange Dressing Black Beans & Rice Extravaganza; Green Salad; Fresh Fruit

Tuesday

Green Smoothie; English Muffin with Nut Butter Green Pea GuacamoleWrap; Fresh Fruit Creamy Curried Cauliflower Soup; Roasted Veggie Couscous; Green Salad

Wednesday

Apple-Cinnamon Oat Squares; Fresh Fruit Garbanzo & Veggie-Stuffed Pitas; Fresh Fruit Romantic Rice Bowl (for a vegan option, substitute portobello mushrooms for the chicken); Fresh Fruit Platter

Thursday

Fruit Smoothie; English Muffin with Nut Butter Creamy Curried Cauliflower Soup; Romaine Salad Whole Grain Pasta with Greens & Beans; Green Salad; Fresh Fruit

Friday

Hot Cereal with Dried Fruit & Nuts Whole Grain Pasta with Greens & Beans; Veggies; Fruit Apple Cooked beans and Roasted Sweet Potatoes; Lemon Treats

Saturday

Loaded English Muffins; Fresh Fruit Salad Lentil Chili; Spinach Salad Layered Vegetable Enchiladas; Banana Nice Cream

Meal Recipe Ideas

Breakfast:

Lunch:

 

Dinner:

Snacks:

  • Apple slices with nut butter
  • Fresh fruits
  • Dried fruits, especially raisins
  • Applesauce or other fruit cups
  • Nuts, especially mixed with dried fruit
  • Soy yogurt
  • Individual boxes of soymilk, rice milk, or fruit juices
  • Breadsticks or pita chips with hummus
  • Pretzels or popcorn
  • Homemade muffins or cornbread
  • Ramen soup with added vegetables
  • Fresh soybeans (edamame)
  • Tofu hot dogs
  • Tortilla chips with bean dip
  • Cheerios, granola, or other cereal in a bag
  • Toasted whole-grain breads or crackers with fruit spread or nut butters
  • Graham crackers or gingersnaps dipped in applesauce
  • Mini rice cakes with peanut butter
  • Frozen bananas blended with a little non-dairy milk
  • Chopped raw vegetables and dip

Desserts:

 

Resources for Recipes and Information:

Oh She Glows

Happy Herbivore

Cookie & Kate

PCRM

Love & Lemons

Greatist.com

Whole Foods Cleanse

Will you join me in this special one-week cleanse?

  • Who: YOU are invited to participate?
  • What: One-Week Cleanse made up of primarily whole foods, no processed or packaged foods.
  • When: Monday, February 29 – Sunday, March 6
  • Additional information and instruction will be provided throughout the week.
  • Free guidance and support will be offered, by me, as needed 🙂
*Note: This cleanse does not include any animal products. If you choose to consume animal products during the cleanse that is up to you. However, I do suggest that you choose to refrain from consuming animal products during the cleanse and determine how your body feels upon completion of the cleanse* 

Please contact Angela Joy with any questions or concerns! If you are interested in participating, please contact Angela Joy at angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

❤ Sending you love, joy, blessings and health,

Angela Joy xo

One-Week Whole Foods Cleanse: Preparation

Blog Post # 4: Properly Preparing for the Cleanse

This post is part of a series of blog post articles that will/are being posted throughout the week in preparation of the cleanse which will occur next week. You are welcome to join and/or follow along! Please notify me if you are interested in joining. I will be happy to offer assistance and guidance along the way!
Contact: angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

wholee foods

If you have chosen to participate in the one-week cleanse it is best to fully prepare for the cleanse.

Preparation can be done through:

  • beginning to eat less packaged and processed foods
  • eating less animal products
  • eating more fruits and vegetables
  • drinking more water
  • purchasing foods that will be eaten during the cleanse
  • finding recipes to make during the cleanse
  • planning out meals you would like to eat during the cleanse
  • setting a goal/intention for the cleanse
  • having a journal ready to track progress

Your Healthy Eating Grocery List

Vegetables

  • Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Peppers
  • Carrots
  • Squash
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Onions
  • Garlic

Fruit

  • Berries
  • Bananas
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Avocado
  • Oranges
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons

Grains

  • Quinoa
  • Brown rice
  • Millet
  • Barley
  • Oatmeal

Beans/Legumes

  • Black beans
  • Chickpeas
  • White beans
  • Lentils
  • Azuki
  • Kidney beans

Herbs and Spices

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Chili flakes
  • Cumin
  • Cardamom
  • Cinnamon
  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Thyme

Nuts/Seeds

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Flax seed
  • Chia seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Cashews
  • Brazil nuts

Click here for a printable shopping list: power-plate-shopping-list

Whole Foods Cleanse

Will you join me in this special one-week cleanse?

  • Who: YOU are invited to participate?
  • What: One-Week Cleanse made up of primarily whole foods, no processed or packaged foods.
  • When: Monday, February 29 – Sunday, March 6
  • Additional information and instruction will be provided throughout the week.
  • Free guidance and support will be offered, by me, as needed 🙂
*Note: This cleanse does not include any animal products. If you choose to consume animal products during the cleanse that is up to you. However, I do suggest that you choose to refrain from consuming animal products during the cleanse and determine how your body feels upon completion of the cleanse* 

Please contact Angela Joy with any questions or concerns! If you are interested in participating, please contact Angela Joy at angelajoyhealthfitness@gmail.com

❤ Sending you love, joy, blessings and health,

Angela Joy xo

Eat Right For Your Blood Type: The Vegetarian Blood Type

Blood typeee

By:Angela Ciroalo

Did you know that your blood type can determine how well your body can digest and store certain foods? It can also determine how you react to illness, the behaviors that you express, and the foods that you like.

Naturopathic physician, researcher and lecturer Dr. Peter D’Adamo discovered this observation which led him to study the connection between a person’s blood-type and the diseases or illnesses that they contract.

Blood Type eat right

As a result of his findings he authored the book “Eat Right for Your Blood Type,” outlining where each blood type originated, how the blood types came about, and the characteristics of each blood type.

Dr. D’Adamo explains how our ancestors lived, ate and communicated influenced our health today.

Blood type eat avoid

Blood Type A
Out of the four different blood types—O, A, B and AB—blood type A is the only one that is suggested to consume a fully vegetarian diet.

Dr. D’Adamo explains that those who are blood type A will fair best when they are not consuming meat or dairy.

Furthermore it is important that blood type As consume food in a natural, pure, fresh and organic state.

“I can’t emphasize enough how this critical dietary adjustment can be to the sensitive immune system of Type A,” Dr. D’Adamo states in his book. “With this diet you can supercharge your immune system and potentially short circuit the development of life threatening diseases.”

GBOMBSd

History of Blood Type A

Blood type A was the second blood type created after the original blood type O. Blood type A was created between 25,000 and 15,000 B.C. in either Asia or the Middle East.

During this time, environmental conditions were changing causing the diet and lifestyle to change along with it—hence the birth of a new blood type, blood type A.

Some of the changes some became a part of daily living included agriculture and animal domestication as well as the adaption to living in stable communities with permanent living structures.

Dr. D’Adamo explains that do to these changes the eating habits, lifestyle, digestive tracts and immune system of the inhabitants also changed.

Furthermore, due to the strength of the people who were blood type A, the survival rate increased, outliving many blood type Os. Dr. D’Adamo explains that the immune system of blood type A people was very strong, therefore allowing those who held the blod type to increase and multiply.

Blood type A was able to survive disease like the plague, cholera and smallpox far better than blood type O. Therefore, blood type A did not become extinct and continued to increase as the inhabitants spread into western Europe.

Blood type how to eat

Blood Type A Profile:
Those who are blood type A are known as the original cultivators. Their ancestors reaped what they sowed, meaning they became farmers and consumed fresh foods rather than hunters who consumed meats. As a result, they followed a vegetarian diet consisting of fresh produce and grains.

Blood type As have a difficult time when consuming meat and dairy due to the sensitive digestive systems that they developed.

Therefore, blood type As thrive from fresh, whole foods grown from the land. They are in fact quite opposite of blood type O and will feel sluggish when they consume meats.

One of the reasons for this is that a blood type A person has naturally acidic blood. Therefore, when foods that are acidic enter the blood stream, negative reactions occur. This is very different from a blood type O person whose blood is more alkaline and can digest and assimilate acidic foods without any problems.

Dairy is also avoided, along with meat, because blood type A rejects the sugar in milk. When milk is consumed a blood type A person will have difficulty digesting the milk sugar and issues may occur.

Furthermore, the consumption of milk will often create the production of mucus. Blood type As are known to produce more mucus than other blood types and when dairy is ingested mucus levels increase—often causing respiratory problems, allergic responses, and infections.

As far as the consumption of grains goes, blood type As can consume them, however they must be conscious of the amount they eat. Grains are also acidic and if eaten in excess can cause muscle tissues to become overly acidic.

In sum, the agrarian diet (blood type A diet) recommends a high carbohydrate diet made up of fresh fruits and vegetables with low amounts of fats.

Blood Typee

Foods to Avoid:
Foods that encourage weight gain in blood type As include; meat, dairy, kidney beans, lima beans, and wheat when eaten in abundance.

Foods that are particularly suggested to refrain from eating include processed meats and processed or packaged foods.

Blood type healthy

Foods to Consume:
Foods that encourage weight loss include; vegetables oils, soy foods, vegetables, and pineapples.

Additionally, specific foods that will benefit a blood type A person include;

  • Nuts; peanuts, peanut butter and pumpkin seeds.
  • Oils; linseed or flaxseed oil and olive oil.
  • Dairy; soy cheese and soy milk.
  • Beans; black, green, azuke, red soy, pinto, lentils, black eyes and azuki
  • Cereals; amaranth and buckwheat.
  • Breads; essene, Ezekiel, rice cakes, soy flour, and sprouted wheat bread.
  • Grains and pastas; buckwheat, oat, rice and rye flour, soba noodles, and artichoke pasta.
  • Vegetables; artichoke, beet leaves, broccoli, carrots, chicory, collard greens, dandelion, escarole, garlic, kale, onions, parsley, spinach, and much more
  • Fruits; apricots, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, dried figs, lemons, pineapple, grapefruits, plums and prunes

Blood type

Risks of Diseases:
Those who are blood type A are more susceptible to heart disease and cancer. However, when following the suggested blood type A diet, risk of disease decreases.

For more information on the Blood Type A Diet, refer to Dr. D’Adamo’s book, “Eat Right for your Blood Type, The individualized Diet Solution to Staying Health, Living Longer and Achieving Your Ideal Weight” and visit Dr. D’Adamo’s Blood Type A online profile.

Tips on proper hydration and electrolyte consumption

By: Angela Joy

As summer sets in, many are preparing to take their exercise routines outdoors. However, before you head outside for your next run, bike ride or even basketball game, make sure you are properly hydrated.

The heat of the outdoor sun combined with the movement of our body causes our skin to perspire water and minerals. We sweat out water and minerals to cool the body down, preventing heat exhaustion.

To properly restore the water and minerals lost through our skin, you can follow these helpful tips that will include; the adequate amount of water to drink; the electrolytes needed for proper body functioning; as well as natural, organic electrolyte sources.

What are electrolytes? 

The minerals we lose through sweat commonly known as electrolytes.

According to the online healthcare publishing company Medical News Today [MNT], electrolytes are defined as any substance that contains free ions that behave as an electrically conductive medium.

Electrolytes are made up of minerals including sodium, potassium, calcium, bicarbonate, magnesium, chloride, hydrogen phosphate and hydrogen carbonate.

According to the Medical News Today article titled, “What are electrolytes,” humans cannot function without proper electrolyte levels.

“Electrolytes regulate our nerve and muscle function, our body’s hydration, blood pH, blood pressure and the rebuilding of damaged tissue,” Medical News Today stated in the 2014 article.

Not properly restoring electrolyte levels in the body during or after exercise can lead to dehydration, fatigue, muscle cramping and more.

In an effort to prevent dehydration amongst athletes and exercise enthusiasts, the American College of Sports Medicine [ACSM] created proper hydration standards.

The ACSM suggests that those exercising outdoors, or for long periods of time, replenish the amount of fluid lost, as well as the electrolytes lost, during exercise.

According to ACSM, the amount of fluids and electrolytes each person should consume will depend upon the individual, the amount of sweat perspired, and the length or exertion level of their exercise.

Water

Photo taken from girlsgotsole.com

Tips for avoiding dehydration

To avoid dehydration, the ACSM suggests that those participating in exercise drink 16 to 20 fluid ounces of water, or a sports beverage, at least four hours before exercise with and additional 8 to 12 fluid ounces of water consumed 10 to 15 minutes before exercise.

During exercise, the ACSM suggests that exercisers drink three to eight fluid ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes when exercising less than 60 minutes.

Running water

Photo taken from getactivetampa.com

If exercise is longer than 60 minutes, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise consume three to eight fluid ounces of a sport beverage, made up of carbohydrates and electrolytes, every 15 to 20 minutes.

The ACSM warns that those exercising do not drink more than one quart of liquids per hour, to avoid over-hydrating.

Once exercise is completed, the ACSM suggests that those partaking in exercise estimate their fluid losses, then restore the full amount lost within two hours of exercise.

According to the ACSM, if you were to feel very thin after a bout of exercise, this is the result of fluid loss and not weight loss — therefore the steps to properly restore the body’s fluids should be taken as soon as possible.

Tips for properly restoring electrolytes 

Proper hydrating fluids generally include a carbohydrate [glucose] that also offers electrolyte minerals.

The ACSM stated that a liquid that includes a carbohydrate, or sugar, will replenish the lost glycogen in the muscles — preventing cramps and assisting with muscle recovery.

The ACSM suggests that during exercise the beverage consumed should contain carbohydrates, sodium and potassium.

Natural electrolyte options

Proper hydration restoration can be found in some standard sports drinks, however, in an effort to avoid white granulated sugar and unknown ingredients I chose whole, organic foods and drinks.

As I prepare for a long run, I pack my water bottle with diluted organic coconut water [two parts water, one part coconut water].

Other electrolyte-filled natural options include lemon water with honey and a touch of salt, orange-infused water or electrolyte-filled snacks.

My favorite go-to electrolyte-packed foods to eat during a run include: bananas, raisins and oranges.

Electrolyte 2

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy

Each of these foods contain electrolytes and carbohydrate to allow your body to properly restore the lost water and minerals levels – while also providing needed energy to sustain you.

Most fruits and vegetables contain electrolytes and are filled with water, allowing most raw fruit and vegetables to also serve as a great electrolyte-packed choice.

Group of different fruit and vegetables

Photo taken from enjoyagreatlife.com

Aside from natural foods, there are also many items available to purchase that offer electrolytes. Options include salt tablets, electrolyte-filled chews and gu, as well as electrolyte tablets and powders.

Vega

Photo taken from shopmyvega.com

(If I were to purchase a electrolyte item instead of eating it through food, I would purchase it from the Vega company)

I personally favor natural foods during my runs. However, if a supplement or tablet is more appealing to you, give it a try!

Since incorporating coconut water into my workout routines I have felt much more energy, I have been able to recover more quickly and I have completely avoided brain fog towards the end of my runs.

Coconut water

Photo taken from makecoffee.com

I inspire you to be stronger than your excuses – start exercising for at least a few minutes each day, gradually increase your rate each week, and never give up on yourself.

“Run when you can, walk if you have to, crawl if you must; just never give up,” Ultramarathon champion Dean Karrnazes said.

Remember, hydration is incredibly important — even if you are not an exercise enthusiast. We all should be conscious of our water consumption and never wait till we are thirsty to start drinking water.

Coconut Water Tip: When choosing the type of coconut water that you are going to consume, follow the Food Babe’s advice on the healthiest, purest options –>http://bit.ly/1l3r61i

Best,

Angela Joy

Originally published in Night & Day Magazine

Eat More Kale: Here is Why

By: Angela Ciroalo

The green leafy vegetable KALE has received national recognition over the past two years or so.

People are adding it in their salads, wraps, smoothies and juices.

But why kale? What is so great about this green leafy vegetable that people are going crazy over it?

Kale

According to a report from Medical News Today, kale is PACKED with nutrition.

Kale can improve the health of your skin, hair, bones, improve digestions, while also lowering your risk of heart disease.

Medical News Today also reports that consuming kale can improve blood glucose control amongst diabetic patients, lower the risk of cancer, lower blood pressure, lower the risk of asthma, and much more.

Kale

Medical News Today (MNT) found that kale is a leafy green cruciferous vegetable that is chock-full of essential vitamins A, C and K as well as minerals like copper, potassium, iron, manganese and phosphorus.

A cup of fresh kale contains an average of only 40 calories, while providing an average of three grams of protein!

Furthermore, MNT stated that one cup of cooked kale has over 1000-percent more vitamin C than one cup of cooked spinach — and unlike spinach kale’s oxalate content is very low which means that the calcium and iron in kale are highly absorbable in the human digestive system. (Which is a HUGE plus!)

Mind Body Green created a list of 10 reasons why KALE is simply amazing 🙂

Kale e

TEN reasons to LOVE kale: 

1. Kale is low in calorie, high in fiber and has zero fat. One cup of kale has only 36 calories, 5 grams of fiber and zero grams of fat. It is great for aiding in digestion and elimination with its great fiber content. It’s also filled with so many nutrients, vitamins, folate and magnesium as well as those listed below.

2. Kale is high in iron. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef. Iron is essential for good health, such as the formation of hemoglobin and enzymes, transporting oxygen to various parts of the body, cell growth, proper liver function and more.

3. Kale is high in Vitamin K. Eating a diet high in Vitamin K can help protect against various cancers. It is also necessary for a wide variety of bodily functions including normal bone health and blood clotting. Also increased levels of vitamin K can help people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

4. Kale is filled with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants, such as carotenoids and flavonoids help protect against various cancers.

5. Kale is a great anti-inflammatory food. One cup of kale is filled with 10% of the RDA of omega-3 fatty acids, which help, fight against arthritis, asthma and autoimmune disorders.

6. Kale is great for cardiovascular support. Eating more kale can help lower cholesterol levels.

7. Kale is high in Vitamin A. Vitamin A is great for your vision, your skin as well as helping to prevent lung and oral cavity cancers.

8. Kale is high in Vitamin C. This is very helpful for your immune system, your metabolism and your hydration.

9. Kale is high in calcium. Per calorie, kale has more calcium than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism. Vitamin C is also helpful to maintain cartilage and joint flexibility

10. Kale is a great detox food. Kale is filled with fiber and sulfur, both great for detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy.

Incorporating Kale In To Your Diet

Now that you have learned WHY kale is so wonderful, here are a few ways that you can begin to incorporate it into your diet.

I consume kale almost every day.

Photos below were all taken from huffingtonpost.com

Some of the ways that I eat kale will consist of:

  • Using one or two leaves in a fruit/protein smoothie

Kale Smoothie

  • Baking kale topped with nutritional yeast for a kale chip snack

Kale Chips

  • Adding some kale leaves to a salad

Kalee salad

  • Making a kale wrap – Instead of the bread or create a kale lettuce wrap (YUM)
  • Juicing with kale
  • Adding kale into a soup

Tofu and kale

  • Sauteing kale with spinach and garlic
  • Adding kale to a sandwich – sub the lettuce

Kale Sandwhich

  • Placing kale in a casserole
  • Frying kale with eggs/tofu scramble
  • Cooking kale in a pasta

Kale salad two

The possibilities are endless!!

I will post some of these wonderful kale-inspired recipes soon 🙂

Until then, enjoy a delicious heaping of kale during your next meal.

If you decide yo make something special with kale, let me know. I would love to hear about it!

Wishing you love, joy and blessings XO,

Angela Joy ❤

Resources:
MNT: http://bit.ly/1j70cZD
Mind Body Green: http://bit.ly/1gCf0vo

The healthy way to fuel for long distance running

By: Angela Joy

As a runner, or exercise enthusiast, the foods that you eat should be taken just as seriously as the shoes you wear and the time you finish in.

Unfortunately, proper diet is not always top priority.

According to Erin Strout of Running Times Magazine, runners continue to follow the age-old beliefs that eating large amounts of pasta the night before, chugging bottles of sports drinks or following fad diets, will improve performance.

However, what runners are beginning to recognize more commonly is that high quality protein, fats, carbohydrates, electrolytes and superfoods, each play an intrical role in fueling a succesful athlete.

Healthy Foods

Photo taken from wicklowpartnership.ie

Ms. Stout writes in the Running Times magazine, proper nutrition and hydration are critical components for improved running capabilities.

Upon first beginning my running career I was not aware of the importance of a healthy diet.

I maintained a seemingly healthy diet, although had not true idea of what health really was.

I followed the all of the age-old runner beliefs, leading me to suffer during my first half marathon race.

It wasn’t long after when I recognized the importance of nutrition and consuming healthy organic whole foods as a runner.

During my second half marathon I cut my time by 15 minutes, finished strong, and recovered almost immediately after.

A year or so later, I took on the next challenge – running a full marathon.

I began my training unaware of how often or what types of foods I would need while running a distance longer than 90 minutes.

I can still remember coming home from my first 15 mile run. I was ecstatic, but once I met my living room I was done for the day.

I went to bed that night with an incredible headache and woke up the next day feeling worse than ever.

It was at this point that I looked to ultramarathon champion, and author of the book, “Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness,” Scott Jurek.

SCott Jurek

Photo taken from Twitter.com

Jurek is known for his victories in nearly every elite ultra trail and road event. He is most commonly recognized for his seven straight victories at the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, his record-breaking Badwater 135-mile Ultramarathon win, and his historic 153-mile Spartathalon win.

Jurek explains the importance of eating carbohydrates prior to a run, eating carbohydrates during a run that is longer than 90 minutes, and eating protein 30 minutes after a run to restore your energy levels and avoid fatigue.

Jurek follows a whole foods plant-based diet, and suggests that runners eat a variety of organic whole foods such as grains, legumes, green vegetables and fruits.

Running

In reaction to reading Mr. Jurek’s book, and seeking guidance from other professional runners, I created this training guide to prepare for long runs:

Day before:
Avoid carbo-loading the night before.
Instead, focus on fueling your body on quality protein, unsaturated fats and carbohydrates throughout the day.
Your body will store the protein, fats and carbohyrates and utilize them the following day.
Also make sure to allow the body proper time to digest all of the food you eat, prior to race morning. In other words, try not to eat too late at night.

A sample pre-race day, or pre-long run, meal for me would include:
Organic brown rice
Black beans
Avocado
Tomato
The day before I also snack on different fruits and nuts between meals.

Morning before: Before embarking on a long run it is best to wake up at least 30 minutes to one hour before running to allow yourself to eat and digest the food.

Each runner’s stomach will handle foods and digestion differently, therefore trial and error is key – the same goes with foods eaten during the run.

Carbohydrates are key the day of a run.

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My pre-run meal often consists of a piece of cinnamon raisin Ezekiel toast with peanut butter and a banana or orange. If I wake up early, I will eat a small bowl of oatmeal with organic blueberries.

During the run: A runner only needs to consume food if they are partaking in exercise longer than 90 minutes.

If running for longer than 90 minutes it is best to eat every 30 minutes, or so, to fully restore the body’s glycogen levels.

Most professional athletes suggest eating at least 30 grams of carbohydrates every 30 minutes.

Jurek created a conversion that meets each runner’s specific needs through relying on the runner’s weight.

The runner’s body weight, divided by 2.2, multiplied by .7, equates to the amount of carbohydrates consumed while running.

Jurek’s conversion: (Body weight/2.2) x .7 = grams of carbohydrates

I weigh 130 pounds, therefore my conversion would appear as; (130/2.2) x .7 = 41.4.

What to eat on the run:

Many runners reach for sports gels to meet their carbohydrate needs while exercising.

I opted for the natural whole foods remedies.

A few examples of foods I consume while running include;
Bananas
Figs
Organic fruit baby foods
Dates

While running I eat one item every 30 to 40 minutes and drink water after every mile.

sproutbabyfood

Photo take from: livingrichwithcoupons.com

Angela’s Tip:
Bananas are a common go-to food for me while running. I often peel the banana right before the run and place it in a plastic bag untouched. I will mush it up right before I eat it to allow easier digestion and carbohydrate absorption.

Post-Run: After completing a run it is time for the body to refuel, recover and prepare for the next run.

Physiologist Deborah Shulman concluded in an article on Active.com titled, “Get enough protein post-workout,” that it is important to consume carbohydrates and protein within 30 minutes of completing endurance exercise.

She explained that the nutrients consumed after exercise will fend off fatigue and promote recovery.

Ms. Schulman suggests that 20 grams of protein is optimal after completing an endurance exercise activity.

She said 20 grams can often be found in one scoop of protein powder.

What to eat after a run: Eating can be difficult after undergoing a sustained, difficult workout. My solution is to reach for a protein-packed smoothie.

I often consume one full cup of a protein smoothie after each run.

Angela 3

Photo courtesy of Angela Joy

My favorite post-run smoothie; Blueberry, banana and flax seed smoothie

  • Banana
  • Rice milk – you can use any kind of milk
  • Frozen blueberries
  • Hemp protein
  • One tablespoon of crushed flax seeds
  • One teaspoon of cinnamon

If you prefer a sweet smoothie, include one teaspoon of honey or maple syrup to the mix.

Finding Inspiration

A quote that gets me through long, strenuous runs is one of Jurek’s common phrases, “Sometimes, you just do things.”

The quote resonates with me to the fact that I don’t have a specific explanation of why I run other than the fact that I simply enjoy it.

Truly, we don’t need an explanation for why we do things that make us happy – it is just important that we go out there and do them.

Don’t worry about what people think or say – just do it.

I challenge you to go out and do something that you love for the simple reason that, “Sometimes we just do things.”

Blog Post Takeaway:

Healthy Food

Photo taken from:socialdashboard.com

Have you ever heard of the expression, “You are what you eat,” well, my motto is, “Your performance is only as good as the food that you eat.”

Therefore, make sure that you are eating well!

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. I hope it was helpful! Please share your feedback, comments, questions.

❤ Wishing you lots of love, joy and blessings

-Angela Joy

Information obtained from:

  1. http://running.competitor.com/2014/04/inside-the-magazine/the-long-run/the-long-run-eating-on-the-run_28754
  2. http://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-for-runners/fueling-facts
  3. http://www.active.com/nutrition/articles/get-enough-protein-post-workout
  4. Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness by Scott Jurek with Steve Friedman
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